Department of Chemistry

BSc in Chemistry

 

 

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

FACULTY OF SCIENCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAGANNATH UNIVERSITY, DHAKA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Syllabus for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc) in Chemistry

Session: 2015-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Chemistry

Jagannath University, Dhaka

Syllabus for Session: 2015-2016

 

Department of Chemistry is one of the most active discipline under the faculty of Science and offers relevant courses to produce highly skilled graduates with theoretical and well equipped practical knowledge. Courses of study for a Bachelor of Science (Honours) degree in Chemistry shall extend over a period of 4 (four) academic years and each academic year shall be divided into 2 (two) semesters. As a result the whole courses of study shall be divided into 8 (eight) semesters. A Semester is conducted for a period of 6 (six) months named as 1st Semester and 2nd Semester in each academic year. Examinations shall be held at the end of each semester.

A student of Bachelor’s programme in Chemistry shall have to conduct all 62 (sixty two) courses (156 credits) listed in syllabus. Of the 62 courses, there will have 45 (forty five) theoretical courses (110 credits), 13 (thirteen) practical courses (38 credits), and 4 (four) viva-voce courses (8 credits). Among the courses offered, a student shall have to conduct a total of 4 (four) courses (8 credits) related to Physics and 4 courses (10 credits) related to Mathematics as integrated course.

 

Assignment of Credits:

Theoretical Courses: A 3 credits course will involve three lecture hours per week
(a total of 45 lecture hours) and a 2 credits course will involve two lecture hours per week
(a total of 30 lecture hours).

Practical Course: In case of practical/lab course, there shall be at least four (04) contact hours for two (02) credit points in a week. As a result, there shall be at least 60 contact hours for two (02) credit points practical/lab course throughout the Semester.

Marks Distribution: Of the total marks in a theoretical or a practical course, 70% will be from the written/ practical examination to be held at the end of the course as final examination and 30% as continuous assessment. Among the 30% marks of continuous assessment for Theoretical courses, 67% are allocated for two mid-semester examination and 33% are allocated for class attendance. On the other hand, among the 30% marks of continuous assessment for Practical courses, 67% are allocated for participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Oral/Written test on Laboratory Work/Field Work/Internship/Project/Research and 33% are allocated for class attendance.

 

Department of Chemistry

Jagannath University

Syllabus for Session: 2015-2016

 

1st Year 1st Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-1111

Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

 

3

100

CHE -1121

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry-I

 

3

100

CHE -1131

Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry

 

3

100

CHEL-1130

Qualitative Inorganic Analysis and Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry Lab

 

3

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHER-1111

Mechanics and Properties of Matter

 

2

50

CHER-1115

Fundamental of Mathematics

 

3

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Total          

 

17

550

 

 

1st Year 2nd Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-1211

Physical Chemistry

 

2

50

CHE-1221

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry-II

 

2

50

CHE-1231

Inorganic Chemistry

 

2

50

CHEL-1230

Quantitative Inorganic Analysis Lab-I

 

3

100

CHEV-1200

Viva-voce

 

2

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHER-1211

 

Electricity & Magnetism

 

2

50

CHER-1216

Calculus-I

 

3

100

 

 

 

 

 

     Total          

 

16

450

 

Note: Student having less than 60% of class attendance shall not be allowed to sit for the examination.

 

Department of Chemistry

Jagannath University

 

2nd Year 1st Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-2111

Thermodynamics and Electrochemistry-I

 

2

50

CHE-2121

Chemistry of Organic Compounds

 

2

50

CHE-2122

Synthetic Organic Polymer

 

2

50

CHE-2131

Chemistry of the Elements-I

 

2

50

CHEL-2110

Physical Chemistry Lab-I

 

3

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHER-2111

Optics

 

2

50

CHER-2116

Ordinary Differential Equations

 

2

50

CHERL-2112

Physics Laboratory

 

2

50

 

 

 

 

 

     Total          

 

17

450

 

 

 

2nd Year 2nd Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-2211

Thermodynamics and Electrochemistry-II

 

3

100

CHE-2221

Stereochemistry of Organic Compounds

 

3

100

CHE-2231

Chemistry of the Elements-I

 

2

50

 

CHE-2232

Bioinorganic Chemistry

 

2

50

CHEL-2220

Systematic Qualitative Identification of Organic Compounds

 

3

100

CHEV-2200

Viva-voce

 

2

50

CHER-2215

Calculus-II

 

2

50

 

 

 

 

 

     Total          

 

17

500

 

 

 

Note: Student having less than 60% of class attendance shall not be allowed to sit for the examination.

 

Department of Chemistry

Jagannath University

 

 

 

3rd Year 1st Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-3111

Phase Equilibria, Colloid and Chemistry of Surfaces

 

3

100

CHE-3112

Quantum Chemistry and Statistical Mechanics

 

3

100

CHE-3121

Organic Reaction Mechanism

 

3

100

CHE-3122

Bioorganic Chemistry

 

3

100

CHE-3131

Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding

 

3

100

CHE-3141

Chemical Process Industries-I (Inorganic)

 

2

50

CHEL-3110

Physical Chemistry Lab-II

 

3

100

CHEL-3120

Laboratory Synthesis of Organic Compounds

 

3

100

     Total          

 

23

750

 

 

 

 

 

3rd Year 2nd Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-3211

Chemical kinetics and Catalysis

 

3

100

CHE-3221

Natural Product Chemistry

 

2

50

CHE-3222

Medicinal Chemistry

 

2

50

CHE-3231

Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry

 

3

100

CHE-3241

Chemical Process Industries-II (Organic)

 

2

50

CHE-3251

Chemical Spectroscopy-I

 

3

100

CHEL-3210

Physical Chemistry Lab-III

 

3

100

CHEL-3240

Chemical Process Industries Lab-I (Inorganic)

 

3

100

CHEV-3200

Viva-voce

 

2

50

     Total          

 

23

700

 

 

 

Note: Student having less than 60% of class attendance shall not be allowed to sit for the examination.

 

Department of Chemistry

Jagannath University

 

 

 

4th  Year 1st Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-4111

Polymer Chemistry

 

3

100

CHE-4112

Photochemistry

 

2

50

CHE-4122

Fundamentals of Pharmaceutical Chemistry

 

3

100

CHE-4151

Chemical Spectroscopy-II

 

2

50

CHE-4161

Environmental Chemistry

 

2

50

CHE-4171

Analytical Chemistry

 

3

100

CHEL-4120

Separation and Quantitative Estimation of Organic Compounds

 

3

100

CHEL-4130

Quantitative Inorganic Analysis Lab-II

 

3

100

     Total          

 

21

650

 

 

 

 

4th Year 2nd Semester

The courses, credits, and distribution of marks are as follows:

Course Code

            Titles

 

Credits

Marks

CHE-4211

Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro analytical Methods

 

3

100

CHE-4212

Solid State Chemistry

 

2

50

CHE-4221

Chromatographic and other separation techniques

 

2

50

CHE-4231

Advanced Topics In Inorganic Chemistry

 

3

100

CHE-4232

Nuclear Chemistry

 

2

50

CHE-4233

Crystallography

 

2

50

CHEL-4210

Physical Chemistry Lab-IV

 

3

100

CHEL-4220

Chemical Process Industries Lab-II (Organic)

 

3

100

CHEV-4200

Viva-voce

 

2

50

     Total          

 

22

650

 

 

 

Note: Student having less than 60% of class attendance shall not be allowed to sit for the examination.

 

1st Year 1st Semester

Course: CHE-1111

Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);   3 Credit points; Number of Lectures: 45

 

1.       States of Matter                                                        

Microscopic  and macroscopic system, properties of  molecules, potential and kinetic energy of molecules,     degrees of freedom of motion, translational, rotational and  vibrational energy of systems, principle of equipartition of energy, state of  aggregation of matter.

2.       The Gaseous State                                                           

Properties of gases, the gas laws, ideal and real gases, ideal gas equation, kinetic theory  and its application to ideal gases, calculations regarding kinetic theory, various kinds of molecular velocities, mean free path, collision diameter and collision number, diffusion of gases.  

3.       Behavior of Real Gases                                   

Pressure-Volume behavior of real gases, deviation of real gases from ideal behavior, deduction of Vander Waal’s equation, van der Waal’s constants and their significances, other equations of state for real gases.

4.       Gas-Liquid Transition                        

Andrew’s experiment, critical state of matter, importance of critical temperature, continuity of state, application of Vander Waal’s equation on critical phenomena, principle of corresponding states. Principle of liquefaction of gases, different methods for liquefaction of gases, liquefaction of hydrogen and helium, production of very low temperature, application of liquefaction.

 

5.       The Liquid State and Solutions                      

Classification of physical properties, surface tension, viscosity, molar refractivity and dipole moment, vapour pressure and its dependence on temperature, boiling point and its dependence on pressure. Solution: types of solution, units of concentration, solution of gas in liquid, Henry’s law, solution of solid in liquid, solubility, influence of temperature on solubility.

 

6.       Colligative Properties of Dilute Solution

Vapour pressure of a liquid, colligative properties, Raoult’s law, validity and limitations of Raoult’s law, ideal and non-ideal solutions, lowering of vapour pressure, elevation of boiling point, and depression of freezing point, determination of molecular weight of a solute, osmosis, osmotic pressure, and mechanism of the action of semipermeable membrane, experimental determination of osmotic pressure, laws of osmotic pressure, relation between osmotic pressure and other colligative properties, colligative properties of electrolytes.

 

      Books Recommended

1.       P W Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry

2.       G W Castellan

:

Physical Chemistry

3.       S Glasstone

:

A text book of Physical Chemistry

4.      S.H Maroon and Pruttons

:

Principle of Physical Chemistry

5.       M. M.Haque. And M.Y.A. Mollah

:

Principles of Physical Chemistry

 

Course: CHE -1121

Fundamentals Organic Chemistry-I

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%); 3 Credit points; Number of Lectures: 45

 

  1. Structure and Electron Displacement Effect of Organic Compounds                       

Hybridization of orbitals, electrophiles and nucleophiles, carbanions, and formation of carbocations,  free radicals and their stabilities, polar and nonpolar molecules; inductive, electromeric, mesomeric  and hyperconjugation effect .

  1. Aliphatic Hydrocarbons                                                                                                          

2.1                Alkanes and Cycloalkanes                                                                             

Structure, nomenclature, sources, physical and chemical properties, general preparation, free radical halogenations of alkanes and some other important reactions.

2.2                Alkenes                                                                             

Structure, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of alkenes, general preparations, electrophilic addition reactions, Markovnikov’s rule and Kharasch’s effect, some important reactions.

2.3                Alkynes                                                                             

Structure, nomenclature, general preparation, reactions of alkynes, acidity of alkynes, comparison among alkanes, alkenes and alkynes.

  1. Alkyl and Aryl Halides                                      

Structure, nomenclature, preparation and properties of alkyl and aryl halides, simple idea about substitution and elimination reactions, important reactions and applications.

  1. Aromatic Hydrocarbons                                        

Sources, structure of  benzene, concept of aromaticity, Hückel rule, nomenclature, preparations, disubstitution in benzene ring, activation and deactivation of aromatic disubstituted benzene ring and reasons of variations, electrophilic substitution reaction: nitration, sulphonation, halogenation, Friedel-Crafts alkylation and acylation, benzene derivatives.

 

Books Recommended

1.        R. T. Morrison and R. N. Boyd

:

Organic Chemistry

2.        I. L. Finar

:

Organic Chemistry, Vol. I

3.        W. Solomons

:

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

4.        B.S. Bahl and Arun Bahl

:

Advanced Organic Chemistry

 

Course: CHE -1131

Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);  3 Credit points; Number of Lectures: 45

 

1.    Structure of Atom                                                               

Fundamental particles, cathode rays, determination of ratio of charge to mass (e/m) of an electron, determination of charge of an electron, X-ray, radioactivity; nature and characteristics of the radioactive particles, J.J. Thomson’s experiment, Rutherford atom model, isotopes, isobar, and isotones.

2.       Quantum Theory                                                                 

Electromagnetic radiation, light and Planck’s quantum theory, atomic spectra, Bohr’s atom model, Bohr’s hydrogen atom, radius of various orbit, Bohr-Sommerfeld modification, radius of various orbital, energy of an electron in various orbits, origin of hydrogen spectrum, frequency, wave length and wave number, wave number from emission spectrum. atomic orbitals, shapes of atomic orbitals. Pauli exclusion principle, Hund’s rule of maximum multiplicity, Aufbau principle, electronic configuration.

3.       Periodic classification of elements                    

The modern periodic table, usefulness and limitation of the periodic table, types of elements, electronic configuration of elements in group and periods, diagonal relationship, periodic properties: atomic radius, ionic radii, ionization potential, electron affinity and electronegativity.

4.       Acids and Bases

Arrhenius concept, Bronsted-Lowry concept, conjugate acids and bases, Lewis concept, Lux-Flood concept, Usanovich concept, Acid-Base strength, hard and soft acids and bases, self- ionization of water and pH.

 

5.       Qualitative Analysis                                                             

Theoretical basis of inorganic qualitative analysis, principle of the analytical classification of metals, principle of precipitation reactions, solubility product, common ion effect, interfering acid radicals and principles of their separation.

 

Books recommended            

1.       F A Cotton, G Wilkinson, P L Gaus

:

Basic Inorganic Chemistry

2.       D.D. Ebbing

:

General Chemistry

3.       SS Zumdahl

:

General Chemistry

4.       S.Z Haider

:

Introduction to Modern Inorganic Chemistry

5.       D.F Shriver and P.W Atkins

:

Inorganic Chemistry

6.       R. D Madan

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

 

Course: CHEL-1130

Qualitative Inorganic Analysis and Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry Lab

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70%, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30% (Attendance – 10%, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20%);   3 Credit points

 

1.       Systematic semi micro / macro qualitative inorganic analysis of inorganic salt containing five radicals (at least two from both types of ion)

Techniques of detections, separation, identification and confirmation by semi-micro/macro method., removal of interfering substance, treatments of non soluble substance.

2.       Purification of inorganic compounds

Purification of commercial sodium chloride by (i) recrystallization and (ii) salting out processes. 

3.       Preparation of inorganic compounds

i)                     Ferrous sulphate,         FeSO4.7H2O

ii)                   Mohr’s salt,   FeSO4 (NH4)2SO4. 6H2O.

iii)                  Potash alum,                K2SO4 Al2(SO4)3.24H2O.

iv)                 Chrome alum,              K2SO4 Cr2(SO4).24H2O

v)                   Sodium thiosulphate   Na2S2O3                                                            

   

  Books recommended

1.       A. I. Vogel

:

A Text Book of Inorganic Qualitative Analysis, 4th edition

2.       S. Paul & P. Chackrabarty

:

B.Sc Practical Chem.

3.       Dr. Hazari, Das & Dey

:

Analytical and Practical Chemistry.

 

Course: CHER-1111

Mechanics and Properties of Matter

Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);   2 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  30

 

  1. Vector Analysis

Addition and multiplication of vectors; Triple scalar and vector products, Derivatives of vectors; Gradient, Curl and Divergence and their physical significance.

  1. Rotational Kinematics

Rotational motion; Rotation with constant angular acceleration; Rotational quantities as vector, Relation between kinematics for a particle in linear and circular motion (vector form).

  1. Elasticity

Module of elasticity; Poisson’s ratio; Relation between elastic constants.

  1. Gravitation

Newton’s law; Gravitational potential; Gravitational field and potential and their calculation in simple cases; escape velocity; Compound and Keter’s pendulum.

  1. Fluid Dynamics

Streamline flow; turbulence; Poiseulli’s equation; Reynold’s Number; Bernoulli’s theorem and its applications.

 

      Books Recommended

  1. Spiegel, M.

:

Vector Analysis

  1. Resnick, R. and Halliday, D.

:

Physics

  1. Symon

:

Mechanics

  1. Prancis W. Sears, Mark W. Zimansky

:

University Physics

  1. Resnick, R., Halliday, D. and Krane, K.

:

Physics

  1. Matur, D.S.

:

Properties of Matter

 

Course: CHER-1115

Fundamental of Mathematics

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);   3 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  45

 

1.       The Real Number System

Field and order properties; Natural numbers, integers, and rational numbers; Absolute value; Basic inequalities (Including inequalities involving means, power inequalities of Weierstrass, Cauchy, Chebyshev).

  1. Complex Number System

Field of Complex numbers; De-Moivre’s theorem and its applications.

3.       Theory of equations

Relations between roots and coefficients; Symmetric functions of roots; Sum of the powers of roots Synthetic division; De Cart’s rule of signs; Multiplicity of roots; Transformation of equations.

4.       Two-dimensional Geometry

Transformation of coordinates; Pair of straight lines (homogeneous second degree equations, general second degree equations representing pair of straight lines, angle between pairs of straight lines, bisectors of angles between pairs of straight lines),General equations of second degree; Conic Sections (reduction to standard forms, identifications, properties and tracing of conics).

5.       Vector Geometry

Vectors in plane and space; Algebra of vectors; Rectangular Components; Scalar and Vector product;  Scalar triple product and vector triple product.

6.       System of Linear Equations

System of linear equations (homogeneous and non homogeneous) and their solutions; gaussian elimination;matrices and matrix operations; algebra of matrices; determinant function and its properties; elementary row (or column) operations and row reduced echelon matrix; invertible matrices and their inverses; diagonal, triangular and symmetric matrices. 

7.       Vector Spaces

Euclidean n-space; real vector spaces; subspaces; linear combinations of vectors; linear independence; basis and dimension; linear transformations; matrix representation of linear transformation; Kernel and image; inverse linear transformation; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors.

8.       Three-dimensional Geometry

Three-dimensional coordinates; distance; direction cosines and direction ratios; planes (equations of plane, angle between two planes, distance of a point from a plane); straight lines (equation of lines, relationship between planes and lines, shortest distance); spheres; conicoids (basic properties).

 

 

Books Recommended

  1. Schaum’s Outline Series

:

Theory and problems on set theory and related topics

  1. Prof. Md. Abdur Rahman.

:

Higher algebra

  1. Dewan Md. Abdul Quddus, Sawkot Hossain and Md. Mizanor Rahman.

:

Fundamentals of Mathematics

  1. H.H.Askwith

:

Analytic Geometry of Conic Section

  1. J.M.Kar

:

Analytic Geometry of Conic Section

 

 

1st Year 2nd Semester

Course: CHE -1211

Physical Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);    2 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  30

 

1.       Chemical Equilibrium

Reversible reaction; Chemical equilibrium and its dynamic nature, law of mass action, law of equilibrium, position of equilibrium, equilibrium constant, properties and significance of equilibrium constant; equilibrium constant in different units Kp, Kc, Kx and their relationships, application of  the law of equilibrium to homogeneous gaseous reactions and liquid systems; degree of dissociation, factors influencing the position of equilibrium, Le-Chatelier and Braun principle; effect of change in temperature, pressure, concentration, and addition of inert gases on the position of equilibrium, application of Le-Chatelier’s principle, some physical equilibria and important industrial synthesis, applications of law of equilibrium to heterogeneous systems.

2.       Ionic Equillibria

Ostwald’s dilution law; its validity and limitations; ionic product of water; pH scale, pH, and pOH; application of pH; buffer solutions; mechanism of buffer action; determination of the pH values of buffer solutions; Henderson’s equation; uses of buffer solutions.

3.       Energies in Chemistry

Work, heat, and energy; thermodynamic terms, systems and surroundings; Types of systems; State of a system, Exact differentials, State functions; Internal Energy, work of expansion; First law of thermodynamics; Reversible and Irreversible processes; work expression for isothermal reversible and irreversible expansion, thermodynamic properties of an ideal gas; Joule’s experiment; enthalpy, significance of the enthalpy; heat capacities at constant volume and constant pressure, adiabatic processes, work expressions; thermodynamic relations; Joule-Thomson experiment.

4.       Thermochemical Calculations

Heat of reaction, Heat change in a chemical reaction; standard enthalpy of reaction; thermochemical conventions; standard enthalpy of formation and combustion; thermochemical laws; Hess’s law and its application; lattice enthalpy; Bron-Haber cycle; standard enthalpy of solution and neutralization, and their experimental determination; enthalpy changes in various chemical and physical processes; bond enthalpy – its calculation and applications.

 

 

Book s Recommended

1.       P. W. Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry 

2.       G. W. Castellan

:

Physical Chemistry

3.       S. Glasstone

:

A text Book of Physical Chemistry                

4.       S. H. Maroon and C.  F. Prutton

:

Principles of Physical Chemistry         

5.       D. Ebbing.

:

General Chemistry             

6.       M. M.Huque. And M. A. Nawab

:

Principles of Physical Chemistry 

7.       S. Glasstone & D. Lewis.

:

Physical Chemistry

8.       Kundu and Jain 

:

Physical Chemistry

 

Course: CHE -1221

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry-II

Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);    2 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  30

 

  1. Alcohols and Phenols                                          

Structure, nomenclature, classification, preparations, and properties of alcohols and phenols; acidity of alcohols and phenols; important reactions of alcohols and phenols: substitution, esterification, oxidation reaction, coupling reaction, Kolbe synthesis, Fries rearrangement and reductions.

  1. Ethers and Epoxides                                       

Structure, nomenclature, preparation, and reactions of ethers and epoxides; ethers as protecting group; crown ethers.

  1. Aldehydes and Ketones (aliphatic and aromatic)

Nomenclature, general method of preparation, and reactions of aldehydes and ketones; activity differences between aldehydes and ketones; nucleophillic addition to carbonyl compounds and its mechanism; acetal, hemiacetal, and thioketal formation with carbonyl compounds.

  1. Carboxylic Acids (Aliphatic and  Aromatic)

Nomenclature; role of resonance and inductive effect on acid strength; preparation and reaction of carboxylic acids.

  1. Derivatives of Carboxylic Acids

 Structure, preparation, and reactions of carboxylic acid derivatives: esters, acid halides, anhydrides, and amides.

  1. Heterocyclic Compounds                                   

Nomenclature, structure, preparation, physical and chemical properties of heterocyclic compounds:

a)  Five membered ring: pyrole, furan, thiophene imidazole

b)  Six membered ring: pyridine, pyrimidine

c) Fused ring: quinoline,  isoquinoline, indole.

 

Books Recommended 

  1. I. L. Finar

:

Organic Chemistry,  Vol. II & I.

  1. T. Morrison and R.N. Boyd.

:

Organic Chemistry, 6th Edition.

  1. Mc Murry

:

Organic Chemistry

  1. R. W. Griffin

:

 Modern Organic Chemistry

  1. W. Solomons

:

 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

  1. B. S. Bahl and Arun Bahl

:

 Advanced Organic Chemistry

                                                                                       

 

Course: CHE -1231

Inorganic Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);    2 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  30

 

1.       Chemical Bonds

Electronic concepts of chemical bonds; types of bonds; Ionic bond: energy involved in ionic bond; Born- Haber cycle and lattice energy; ionic radii; factors influencing formation of ionic bond; general properties of ionic compounds; covalent character in ionic bond; Fazan’s rule; limitations of ionic bond. Covalent bond: Lewis formula; conditions for the formation of covalent bond; sigma and pi bond; ionic character in covalent bonds; properties associated with covalent bonds; delocalized bonding, resonance, bond length, bond order, bond energy; Co-ordination bond: factors influencing the formation of co-ordination bond; properties of co-ordinate compounds; other types of chemical bonds- metallic bond, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces.

2.       Molecular Geometry and Chemical Bonding Theory

Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory; dipole moment and molecular geometry; Theories of bonding: Valence bond theory (VBT), hybridization of bond orbitals, molecular orbital theory (MOT), bonding and antibonding orbitals, MO diagram of simple homogeneous diatomic molecule.

3.     Types of Reactions

Precipitation reactions; acid- base reactions; oxidation- reduction reactions; oxidizing and reducing agents; assigning oxidation states to bound atoms; redox half reaction; rules for balancing oxidation- reduction reactions; equivalent weights of oxidizing and reducing agents; oxidation-reduction potential; electro chemical series; double decomposition reactions; substitution reactions; condensation reactions; addition reactions; elimination reactions; isomerization reactions; polymerization reactions.  

4.     Quantitative analysis

Definition, importance, accuracy and precision, significant figures and computations, errors, mean deviation, standard deviation.

    

  Books recommended

 

F A Cotton, G Wilkinson, P L Gaus

:

Basic Inorganic Chemistry

D.D. Ebbing

:

General Chemistry

SS Zumdahl

:

General Chemistry

Satya Prakash, Tuli, Basu  and Madan

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

S.Z Haider

:

Introduction to Modern Inorganic Chemistry

D.F Shriver and P.W Atkins

:

Inorganic Chemistry

R.D Madan

:

Modern Inorganic Chemistry

 

Course: CHEL-1230

Quantitative Inorganic Analysis Lab-I

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);

3 Credit points

1.   Neutralization titrations

i)          Standardization of NaOH solution using standard  oxalic acid as a primary standard substances

ii)        Standardization of HCl solution using standard NaOH solution

iii)       Determination of Acetic acid in vinegar

iv)      Determination of Na2CO3 and NaOH in commercial caustic soda.

2.   Oxidation-Reduction Titrations

i)                     Standardization of KMnO4 using standard sodium oxalate solution.

ii)                   Determination of Fe(II) using standard KMnO4 solution.

iii)                  Determination of Fe(III) using standard K2Cr2O7 solution.

iv)                 Determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in a mixture using standerd K2Cr2O7 solution.

3. Iodometric Titration

i)                     Standardization of Na2S2O3 solution using K2Cr2O7 solution.

ii)                   Iodometric determination of copper

iii)                  Iodometric determination of Fe(III)

 

 

 Books recommended

  1. A. I. Vogel

:

A Text Book of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis

  1. Dr. Subhas Paul and Paritosh Chakrabarty

:

B.Sc Practical Chemistry

  1. Hazari, Das and Dey

:

Analytical & Practical Chemistry

  1. General Arthur L Williams, Robert W Richardson,    Horold J Devy, Leon A Kelly and Oliver G Lien (2nd edition )

:

Introduction to laboratory chemistry

 

 

 

 

Course: CHEV-1200

Viva-voce

 50 Marks; 2 Credit point

Viva-voce examination includes the assessment of the students through oral examination of all the courses studied in the whole 1st Year.

 

Course: CHER-1211

Electricity and Magnetism

Examination: 2hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assesment-30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);    2 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  30

 

1.       Electric Field and Potential: Charge and Coulomb’s law; Electric field, Electric Potential, Dipole, Dipole in an electric field; Gauss’s law; Application of Gauss’s law; Equipotential surface.

2.       Capacitors and Dielectrics: Capacitor, Capacitance and its calculation; Dielectrics and Gauss’s law.

3.       Current and resistance: Current density; Ohm’s law; Resistivity and conductivity; Energy transfer in an electric circuit.

4.       Electromotive force and circuits: Electromotive force and potential difference; Kirchhoff’s laws and their applications.

5.       Magnetic fields and interaction: Magnetic force on charge and current; Hall effect; Motion of a charged particle in uniform electric and Magnetic field; The Biot-Savart law and its applications.

6.       Electromagnetic Induction and Inductance: Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction; Lenz’s law; Self and Mutual inductance;.

7.       Electromagnetic Oscillations: CR, LR and LCR circuits in series and parallel; Q-factor.

 

       Book Recommended

  1. Tewari, K.K.

:

Electricity and Magnetism with electronics

  1. Theraja, B.L.

:

Electricity Magnetism and Electronics

  1. Resnick, R., Halliday, D. and Krane

:

Physics

 

 

 

Course: CHER-1216

Calculus-I

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous Assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%);     3 Credit points; Number of Lecture:  45

 

1.       Functions and their graph

Polynomial and rational functions; logarithmic and exponential functions; trigonometric functions and their inverses; hyperbolic functions and their inverses; combinations of such functions.

2.       Limit and Continuity

Definitions and basic theorems on limit and continuity; Limit at infinity and infinite limits; Computation of limits.

3.       Differentiation

Tangent lines and rates of change; Definition of derivative; One-sided derivatives; Rules of differentiation (proofs and applications); Successive differentiation; Leibnitz theorem (proof and application); Related Rates; Linear approximations and differentials.

4.       Integration

Anti-derivatives and indefinite integrals; Techniques of integration; Definite integration using anti-derivatives; Definite integration using Riemann sums; Fundamental theorems of Calculus (proofs and applications) Basic properties of integration; Integration by reduction. 

5.       Applications of derivatives

Rolle’s theorem; Mean value theorem; Maximum and minimum values of functions; Concavity and points of inflection; Optimization problems.

6.       Applications of integration:

Plane areas; Volumes of solids of revolution; Volumes by cylindrical shells; Volumes by cross sections; Arc length. Area of surface of revolution.

7.       Graphing in polar co-ordinates

Curve tracing; Tangents to polar curves; Areas enclosed by curves in polar coordinates; Arclength in polar co-ordinates. 

8.       Improper integrals: Tests of convergence and their applications. Gamma and Beta functions with applications.

9.       Indeterminate forms, L’ Hopital’s rule. Other indeterminate forms.

10.    Approximation and Series : Taylor polynomials and series, Convergence of series, Taylor’s series, Taylor’s theorem with remainders, Differentiation and integration of series. Validity of region Taylor series and computations with series.

 

Books Recommended:

  1. Howard Anton

:

Calculus 8/E

  1. Md. Abu Yousuf  Dewan

:

Calculus

  1. Md. Abdul Quddus

:

Calculus

  1. Md. Shah Alam

:

Calculus

 

 

 

2nd Year 1st Semester

 

Course: CHE-2111

Thermodynamics and Electrochemistry -I

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%), 2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

                                                         

  1. First law of thermodynamics and its limitations; spontaneous and non-spontaneous processes; degradation of energy; second law of thermodynamics, heat engine; Carnot’s cycle; Entropy: state function, entropy changes of systems and surroundings for reversible and irreversible process; ideal gas and mixing of gases; variation of U, H and S with pressure and temperature; standard reaction entropy.

2.       Characteristic Thermodynamic Functions

       Helmholtz and Gibbs function; properties and significance of free energy functions; variation of Gibbs free energy with temperature and pressure; Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, its application, standard reaction Gibbs free energy, conditions for occurring spontaneity and equilibrium in closed systems; Maxwell relations; Thermodynamics of phase change: Clapeyron and Clasius-Clapeyron equation.

  1. Electrochemistry-I: Conductance of electrolytic solution

       Electrolyte, non-electrolyte, and polyelectrolytes; Faraday’s laws of electrolysis and its application; Arrhenius theory of electrolytic dissociation and its verification; Conductance: Specific; equivalent and molar conductances; cell constant; determination of equivalent and molar conductance and cell constant; variation of specific, equivalent, and molar conductance with concentration; effects of temperature, solvents dielectric constant, theory of electrolytic dissociation, Debye-Huckel-Onsager equation; Independent migration of ions: Kohlrausch’s law, its application, application of conductance measurements; conductometric titration, ionic  mobility, transport number of ion and its determination, theories of strong electrolytes, Debye-Huckel limiting law for activity co-efficient, ionic strength.

 

Books Recommended:

6.       P W Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry

7.       S. Glasstone

:

Physical Chemistry

8.       S. Glasstone and D. Lewis

:

Elements of Physical Chemistry

9.      S. Glasstone

:

Introduction to Electrochemistry

10.    M.M Haque and M.A.Nawab

:

Principles of Physical Chemistry

11.    Kundu and Jain

:

Physical Chemistry

12.    Gurdeep  Raj

:

Advanced Physical Chemistry

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
Course: CHE-2121
Chemistry of Organic Compounds

Examination: 2 hours

 
50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%),    2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       Organic Acids and Bases

Concepts, inductive, mesomeric and structural effects on acidity and basicity; acid-bases catalysis.

2.       Amines (Aliphatic and Aromatic)

Nomenclature, preparation, and reactions of amines; Hofmann degradation of quaternary ammonium salts; separation of primary, secondary, and tertiary aliphatic amines. Aromatic diazonium salts: Structure, preparation; introduction of functional groups in aromatic system, coupling reactions.

3.       Organo-Sulpher and Organo-Phosphorus Compounds

Nomenclature, preparation and reactions of mercaptan, thioester, thioaldehyde, thioketone, thioacids, di-thioacids, disulphides and thioamides.

4.       Dienes

Nomenclature and classification of dienes with cumulated double bonds (allenes, cumulenes), and their preparations and reactions.

5.       Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

General introduction, naphthalene, anthracene and phenanthrene: sources, structure, synthesis, and their reactions.

6.       Bi-functional compounds

Active methylene compounds, keto-enol tautomerism, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, hydroxy ketones, 1,2 &1,3- diketones, hydroxy acids.

7.       Organometallic compounds

Synthesis of organometallic compounds containing lithium, magnesium, cadmium, zinc and their synthetic utility.

8.       Nitro and Nitroso compounds

Synthesis, resonance, reactivity and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic nitro and nitroso compounds, reduction of nitro compounds.

 

Books recommended 

1.        I. L. Finar

:

Organic Chemistry, Vol. II & I.

2.       T. Morrison and R. N. Boyd

:

Organic Chemistry

3.       R.W. Griffin

:

Modern Organic Chemistry

4.       J. English H.G. Cassidy and R.I Baird

:

Principles of Organic Chemistry

5.       J.D. Roberts  and Me Casserio

:

Basic Principles of Organic Chemistry

6.       W. Solomons

:

Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

7.       Me Murry

:

Organic Chemistry

 

Course: CHE-2122

 Synthetic Organic Polymer

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%,  Class Attendance 10%),   2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       Polymerization and their Mechanism

a) Addition (chain reaction) and condensation (step reaction) polymerizations.

b) Radical, cationic and anionic polymerization and their kinetics, chain termination, chain transfer, chain retardation and chain inhibition, mechanism of co-polymerization.

2.       Hydrocarbon Polymer

Homopolymers and heteropolymers, low density and high-density polymers and their properties, copolymers: alternating, random, block copolymers, elastomer, thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers and their properties, fiber and elastomer.

3.       Co-ordination Polymerization

Fluid-bed process, ziegler-natta catalysis, mechanism of co-ordination polymerization and its kinetics, metal oxide catalyzed and olefin polymerization, ring opening polymerization.

4.       Configuration of Polymers

Syndiotactic, isotactic, atactic polymers.

5.       Some Important Polymers

Production of monomer unit, physical properties and important uses of polymer, polythene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene, polybutylene, polybutadiene-styrene, neoprene, polymethyl methacrylate, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinyl acetate, polytetrafluoroethylene. Polyamides: nylon 6, nylon 66, nylon 610, nylon 11 and nylon 12, silk and wool.

6.       Thermosetting Resins

Phenol-formaldehyde, phenol-urea, melamine formaldehyde polymers their preparation and uses, epoxy resins and polyuranthanes.

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       F.W. Billmeyer

:

Textbook of polymer science  

2.       Alfred Rudin

:

The elements of Polymer Science and Technology

3.       George Odian

:

Principles of Polymerization

4.       Premamoy Ghosh

:

Polymer Science and Technology of Plastics and Rubbers

5.       Paul C. Hiemenz

:

Polymer Chemistry the Basic Concepts

6.       P.J. Flory

:

Principles of Polymer Chemistry

7.       R.T. Morrison and RN. Boyd

:

Organic Chemistry

 

 

Course: CHE -2131
Chemistry of the Elements-I

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%),  2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       Hydrogen

General remarks, occurrence, bonding of hydrogen, various forms of hydrogen, ortho and para hydrogen, preparation, properties and uses of isotopes of hydrogen, hydrogen peroxide and heavy water, binary hydrides and their classifications, general study of ionic hydrides, hydrates and water clathrates, hydrogen as future of fuel.

2.       The Alkali Metals

General remarks, occurrence and   properties, ionization energies, cationic sizes and polarization, extraction of Li and Na, diagonal relationship between Li and Mg, binary compounds, oxides, hydroxides and ionic salts, complexation of alkali metal ions, chemistry of potassium.

3.       The Alkaline Earth Metals

General remarks, occurrence and properties, ionization energies, cationic sizes and polarization, extraction of Be and Mg, diagonal relationship between Be and Al, stereochemistry of beryllium. Compounds of magnesium and calcium: complexation of the M2+ ions, Grignard reagents, its synthesis and applications.

4.       The Boron Family

General remarks, occurrence and properties, Oxo-componds of boron and aluminium;  boric acid and borates, tri-halides of boron and lewis acid character of BX3 compounds, boron hydrides, structure and bonding in boranes, molecular orbital concepts of diborane, boron-nitrogen compounds, polyhedral boranes and carboranes.

5.       The Carbon Family

General remarks, allotropes of carbon, the chemistry and physical properties of diamond and graphite, lamellar compounds of graphite, carbides, oxides of carbon and carbonic acids, comparison between carbon and silicon compounds, compounds with C-N and C-S bonds, structure of silicates & alumino silicates.

 

 Books recommended

1.       F A Cotton, G Wilkinson, P L Gaus

:

Basic Inorganic Chemistry

2.       D.D. Ebbing

:

General Chemistry

3.       N.N.Greenwood and A Earnshaw

:

Chemistry of the Elements

4.       Satya Prakash, Tuli, Basu  and Madan

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

5.       S.Z Haider

:

Introduction to Modern Inorganic Chemistry

6.       D.F Shriver and P.W Atkins

:

Inorganic Chemistry

7.       R.D Madan

:

Modern Inorganic Chemistry

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course: CHEL-2110
Physical Chemistry Lab-I

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);   3 Credit points

Name of Experiments

  1. To determine the coefficient of viscosity of a liquid sample by relative viscosity method and using Ostwald’s viscometer.
  2. To study the variation of viscosity of a pure liquid with temperature and determine the temperature coefficient of viscosity of the liquid.
  3. To determine the concentration of an unknown glycerin solution by studying the rates of glycerin solutions, having different concentrations.
  4. To determine the radius of the glycerin molecule by viscosity measurements.
  5. Verification of Hess’s law of constant heat summation.
  6. To determine the heat of hydration of CuSO4 (i.e. the heat of crystallization of CuSO4.5H2O).
  7. To determine the heat of solution by solubility measurements.
  8. To determine the relative strength of two acids by conductance measurements.
  9. To determine the equivalent conductance of a strong electrolyte at several dilutions and verify the Onsagar equation.
  10. To determine the equivalent conductance of a weak electrolyte at infinite dilution using the Kohlrausch’s law.
  11. To determine the cell constant of a conductance cell by conductometric method and the solubility of a sparingly soluble salt by conductometric method.
  12. To determine the concentration of a supplied sample by conductometric titrations using.

i)                    Strong acid – Strong base.

ii)                  Weak acid – Strong base.

iii)                Mixture of strong and weak acid with strong base.

One experiment has to be done in the final examination.

 

Book Recommended

     1. B.P. Levitt       :        Findlay’s practical Physical Chemistry

 

     

Course: CHER-2111

Optics

Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%,  Class Attendance 10%),  2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       Geometrical Optics: Fermat’s principles; Spherical aberration; theory of equivalent lenses; Defect of images.

2.       Coherence:  Properties of light; Theories of light; Spatial and temporal coherence;

3.       Interference: Interference and types of interference; Huygene’s principle; Young’s experiment; Newton’s ring.

4.       Diffraction: Frenels and Fraunhofer diffraction; Diffraction through single slit and double slit; diffraction grating; Dispersive and resolving powers of a grating.

5.       Polarization:  Introduction of Polarization; Polarization by reflection and refraction; Optical Activity; Nicol Prism; Plane, circular and electrical polarization.

               

Books Recommended

 

  1. Ghatak, A

:

Optics

  1. Jenkins, F.A. and White, H.A.

:

Fundamentals of Optics

  1. Hecht, E

:

Optics

  1. Subrahmanyam, N and Lal, B.

:

A Text book of Optics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course: CHER-2116

Ordinary Differential Equations

   Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%,  Class Attendance 10%),  2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       Ordinary differential equations and their solutions

Classification of differential equations, solutions, implicit solutions, singular solutions, initial value problems, boundary value problems, basic existence and uniqueness (statement and illustration only), direction fields, phase line.

2.       Solution of first order equations 

Variables separable equations, linear equations, exact equations, special integrating factors, substitutions and transformations, homogeneous equations, Bernoulli’s equation, Riccati equation, first order higher degree equation-solvable for x, y and p. Clairaut’s equation, singular solutions.

3.       Modeling with first order differential equations

Construction of differential equations as mathematical models (exponential growth and decay, heating and cooling, mixture of solutions, series circuit, logistic growth, chemical reaction, falling bodies). Model solutions and interpretation of results. Orthogonal trajectories.

  1. System of linear first order differential equations

Elimination method, matrix method for homogeneous linear systems with constant coefficients, variation of parameters, matrix exponential.

 

 

Books Recommended:

  1. S.L. Ross

:

Differential Equations

  1. Md. Abu Yousuf

:

Ordinary Differential Equations

  1. Dewan Md. Abdul Quddus- Md. Abdul Awal

:

Ordinary Differential Equations

  1. HTH Piaggo

:

Ordinary Differential Equations

 

 

 

Course: CHERL-2112

Physics Laboratory

Examination: 6 hours

 

50 Marks: i) Experiment: 35, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 15 (Attendance-05, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -10);   2 Credit points

 

  1. To determine of ‘g’, acceleration due to gravity by means of a compound pendulum.
  2. To determine of ‘g’, acceleration due to gravity by means of a Kater's pendulum.
  3. To determine the modulus of rigidity of a wire by dynamic method.
  4. To determine the modulus of rigidity of a wire by static method.
  5. To determine the co-efficient of a liquid (glycerin) using stoke’s law.
  6. To determine the spring constant and effective mass of a given spiral spring and hence to calculate rigidity modulus of the material of the spring.
  7. To determine the specific heat of liquid by the method of cooling.
  8. To determine the mechanical equivalent of heat “J” by electrical method.
  9. To determine the thermal conductivity of a bad conductor by Lee’s method.
  10. To determine the wavelengths of various spectral lines by spectrometer using a plane diffraction grating.
  11. To determine the radius of curvature of a lens by Newton’s rings experiment.

 

     Books Recommended

  1. Din, K. and Matin, M.A.

:

Advanced Practical Physics

  1. Ahmed G. and uddin M.S

:

Practical Physics

  1. Chawdhury S.A  and Basak A.K

:

Advanced Theoretical Physics

  1. Worsnop and Flint

:

Advanced Practical Physics

  1. K. Din

:

Practical Physics

 

 

2nd Year 2nd Semester

 

Course: CHE-2211
Thermodynamics and Electrochemistry -II

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%),              3 Credit points; Number of Lectures – 45

1. Thermodynamics

A. Partial molar quantities and their determination, chemical potential, Gibbs-Duhem equation, thermodynamics of mixing, chemical potential of ideal gas and mixture, variation of chemical potential with temperature and pressure, fugacity and activity, chemical potential of liquids, thermodynamic derivation of colligative properties, solvent and solute activities.

B. Spontaneous chemical reactions, Gibbs energy, exergonic and andergonic reactions, coupled reactions, description of equilibrium, thermodynamic equilibrium constant, van’t Hoff equation, temperature and pressure dependency of equilibrium constant, equilibrium constant from thermal data, feasibility of reactions, Ellingham diagrams and their application, thermodynamics of ATP.

2. Electrochemistry –II                                                      

A. Electrochemical Cell

Electrolytic and galvanic cells, reversible cells, EMF of a cell, origin of EMF of galvanic cell, Nernst’s theory, measurement of EMF : compensation method, half cell or electrode and cell reaction, signs and conventions of expressing electrochemical cell, standard weston cadmium cell, primary and secondary reference electrode , relation between free energy change and EMF of a reversible cell, thermodynamic function and EMF, EMF expression for a reversible cell: Nernst’s equation, EMF and equilibrium constant, single electrode potential, standard electrode potential and its determination. Standard oxidation and reduction potentials, electromotive series and its significance. Application of standard reduction potentials.

B. Concentration Cells

Electrode and electrolytic concentration cell, EMF of a concentration cell with and without transference, liquid junction potential and their calculations and elimination, determination of transport number.

C. Applications of EMF measurements, determination of pH by EMF method using hydrogen, glass and quinhydrone electrode, solubility products principle, determination of solubility products, activity coefficients, analytical applications of EMF measurements. 

D. Potentiometric titration, pH metric titration.

E. Neutralization, Hydrolysis, determination of hydrolytic constants by electrochemical method, theory of indicators, choice of indicators in acid-base neutralization reaction.

F. Electrode Processes

Polarization, concentration polarization activation polarization and ohmic polarization over voltage.

G. Corrosion

Introduction, principle of corrosion, types of corrosion, protection of corrosion, importance of protection of corrosion.

H. Commercial Cell

Dry cell, storage cells or accumulators, lead acid accumulators, alkaline cells and fuel cell.

 

 

Books Recommended

  1.    P.W. Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry

  1. S. Glasstone and D. Heuns

:

Elements of Physical Chemistry

  1. M. M. Haque and M.Y.A. Mollah

:

Principles of Physical Chemistry

  1. S. Glasstone and D. Lewis

:

Introduction to Electrochemistry

  1. A. Alberty

:

Physical Chemistry

  1. Landroper

:

Theoretical Electrochemistry

  1. Bokris and Reddy

:

Advanced Electrochemistry

  1. Gurdey Raj

:

Advanced Physical Chemistry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course: CHE-2221
Stereochemistry of Organic Compounds

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)              3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1.       Optical Activity and Optical Isomerism:

Causes of optical activity, chirality (dissymmetry and asymmetry), prochirality, pseudo chirality, symmetry elements, asymmetric synthesis- Crame’s rule, optical isomers, diastereoisomers, enantiomers, epimers, anomers, meso- and racemic- modification and their resolution, atropisomerism: biphenyls, allenes and spiranes.

2.       Geometrical Isomerism

Conditions, configurations of geometrical isomers: cis-trans and E/Z system, physical properties and configurational assignment of geometrical isomers by physical chemical methods, geometrical isomerism of polyenes, carbon-nitrogen, and nitrogen-nitrogen double bonds and cyclic compounds (cis-trans isomerism in di-substituted cyclohexanes and optical activity). 

3.       Configuration

D & L, threo erythro, R & S configuration. Absolute and relative configurations and their correlation.

4.       Conformations

Conformation and conformers, conformation of propane, butane, ethanediol, dihydroxystyrene, dichlorostyrene, their physical properties and stability, stability of threo and erythro, meso and dl compounds, conformation of cyclobutane, cyclopentane and cyclohexane and their stabilities, conformation of mono and disubstituted cyclohexanes (1,3-di-axial interactions, butane-gauche interactions etc.)

5.       Optical Rotation and Rotatory Power

Factors leading to chirality, molecular dissymmetry, atomic dissymmetry and conformational asymmetry, circular birefringence and circular dichroism (CD), cotton effect, dependence of optical rotation on wavelength— optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) curves and its application.

    

Books Recommended

1.        I. L. Eliel

:

Stereochemistry of Carbon Compounds

2.        P. S.  Spelter

:

Stereochemistry 6th edition

3.        I. L Finar

:

Org-Chemistry-Vol.-II

 
 

 

Course: CHE-2231
Chemistry of the Elements-II

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%), 2 Credit point; Number of Lectures - 30

               

  1. The Noble gases

General remarks, occurrence, isolation and applications, chemistry of noble gases. Xenon compounds: fluorides, oxides and oxifluorides. Krypton compounds; chemistry of radon, clathrate compounds of noble gases.

  1. The Halogens

General remarks, occurrence, isolation and properties, charge transfer compounds of halogens, halide complexes, oxides, oxo-acids and their salts. Positive halogen ions and compounds: pseudohalogens, polyhalogens and interhalogen compounds, halogen acids; recent chemistry of fluorine.

  1. The Chalcogens

General remarks, occurrence, properties isotopes and allotropes of oxygen, peroxides, superoxides and ozonides, dioxygen and oxygen compounds as ligands, hydrogen peroxide and oxygen fluorides, production and importance of ozone in atmosphere, CFC and destruction of ozone layer. Occurrence and allotropes of sulfur: structures of the elemental sulfur, SO2 as nonaqueous solvent and ligand, oxy-acides of sulphur, metal chalconides.

  1. The Nitrogen family

General remarks, Occurrenc, preparation and properties, compounds of nitrogen, strong triple bond, stability of N2 and nitrogen fixation, nitrogen hydrides, nitrogen halides, NH3 as a non-aqueous solvent, salts of ammonium ion, hydrazine, hydroxylamine, azide and hydrazioc acids, oxides and oxo-acids of nitrogen and phosphorus, nitrides, nitrosyl compounds, oxy-acids phosphorus.

  1. Transition Elements

Definition, general characteristics of transition metals and inner  transition metals, position in the periodic table, magnetism in transition metal chemistry, origin of paramagentism and diamagnetism, magnetic susecptibility, Curie’s law ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism, techniques of magnetic measurements-Gouy balance.

 

Books Recommended

  1. F.A. Cotton. G. Wllkinson and P.L Gauss

:

Basic Inorganic Chemistry

  1. D.F. Shriver and  P.W. Atkins 

:

Inorganic Chemistry

  1. R.D. Madan

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

  1. S.Z.Haider

:

Introductions to Modern Inorganic Chemistry  

  1. N.N. Greenwood and A Earnshan

:

Chemistry of the Elements

 

 

 

Course Code: CHE-2232

Course Title: Bioinorganic Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

0.5 Unit (50 Marks) 2.0 Credits

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%), 2 Credit point; Number of Lectures - 30

 

1.                Introduction of bioinorganic chemistry: Inorganic chemistry behind the requirement of biological system for metals such as essential elements and non-essential elements, availability of bioelements, efficiency and specificity of bioactive elements, usefulness of sodium, and potassium, magnesium and calcium as bio-elements, role of calcium in smooth muscle contraction, biochemistry of iron: iron transport and storage,

 

2.                Oxygen transport protein: Hemoglobin and myoglobin, oxygen binding curve of hemoglobin and myoglobin, models of O2 binding,  chytochrome enzyme and cytochrome-C, Chlorophyll, role of magnesium in photosynthesis, vitamin B12 and B12- coenzymes, 

 

3.                Studies of some toxic metals and their toxicity: Arsenic, lead, mercury and chromium, matallothioneins.

 

4.                Metal based drug: Cisplatin, Carboplatin, Platinum anticancer drugs, Radiopharmaceuticals, MRI, Contrast agents. anti-infective drug for skin HIV, AIDS etc

 

Books Recommended

1.     Wolfgang Kaim and Brigitte Schwederski:            Bioinorganic Chemistry, Inorganic Elements in the Chemistry of Life, An Introduction and Guide, John Wiley and Sons.

2.     D. F. Shriver and P. W. Atkins:  Inorganic Chemistry,

3.   F.A. Cotton. G. Wllkinson and P.L Gauss:  Basic Inorganic Chemistry

4.       Huheey, Keiter and Keiter

:

Inorganic Chemistry

 

 

 

Course: CHEL-2220

Systematic Qualitative Identification of Organic Compounds

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20     3 Credit points

 

 

1: Simple Laboratory Techniques

(i)                   Drying and storage of organic compounds

(ii)                 Determination of melting temperature and mixed melting temperature, melting temperature curve.

(iii)                Purification of organic compounds by recrystallization method.

(iv)               Determination of boiling temperature.

(v)                 Purification by distillation. Azeotropic distillation of mixture of alcohol and water.

(vi)               Separation of organic compounds by solvent extraction.

2: Systematic Identification of Organic Compounds

Detection and identification of different types of organic compounds (solid and liquid) by physical and chemical methods. Types of organic compounds: Hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, hydroxy compounds (alcohols and phenols), ethers, carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones), carboxylic acids and their derivatives, α, β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and acids, Keto and hydroxy acids, nitro compounds, amino compounds (Primary, secondary and tertiary), organo-sulphur compounds, amides and N-substituted amides.

 

Books Recommended

1.       A.I. Vogel

:

Elementary Practical Organic Chemistry,

Part-I, Small Scale Preparation

Part-II, Qualitative Organic Analysis

Part-III, Quantitative Organic Analysis

2.        A. I.Vogel

:

A Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry

3.       Shriner, Fusion and Curtin

:

The Systematic Identification of Organic Compounds

4.       H.T. Clarke & B. Haynes

:

A Hand Book of Organic Analysis

 

Course: CHEV-2200

Viva-voce

50 Marks; 2 Credit point

Viva-voce examination includes the assessment of the students through oral examination of all the courses studied in the whole 2nd Year.

 

Course: CHER-2215

Calculus-II

 Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%),     2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

                                                       

1.       Vector valued functions of a single variable

Their limits, derivatives and integrals, Tangent lines to graphs of such functions, Arc length from vector view point, Arc length parameterization.

2.       Curvature of Plane and space curves:

Definition, Curvature from intrinsic equation, Cartesian equations and parametric equations, Radius of curvature, Centre of curvature.

3.       Functions of several variables:

Limit and continuity, Partial derivatives, Differentiability, Linearization and differentials. The chain rule, Partial derivatives with constrained variables, Directional derivatives, Gradient vectors and tangent planes, Extreme values and saddle points of functions of several variables, Lagrange multipliers, Taylor’s formula.

4.       Topics in vector Calculus

Scalar and vector fields, gradient, divergence and curl and their properties, linear integrals, independence of paths, green’s theorem, surface integrals, the divergence theorem, stokes’ theorem.

 

 

Books Recommended

  1. Howard Anton

:

Calculus 8/E

  1. Md. Abu Yousuf Dewan

:

Calculus

  1. Md. Abdul Quddus

:

Calculus

  1. Md. Shah Alam

:

Calculus

 
 

3rd Year 1st Semester

 

Course: CHE-3111

 Phase Equilibria, Colloid and Chemistry of Surfaces

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%) ;           3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1.       Phase Equilibria                                       

A. Phase, Components and degrees of freedom, phase rule and its thermodynamic derivation, applications and limitations, phase rule study of one component system like water, sulfur, thermodynamic criterion of equilibrium,

B. Phase rule study of two component system: solid-liquid system, solid-solid binary systems with reference to alloy. Solid-liquid equilibrium: techniques for constructing t-c diagrams, cooling curves. Systems with and without compound formation-simple eutectic systems and systems having congruent and incongruent melting points. Systems forming completely miscible solids solutions. Factors affecting the formation of solid solution, systems involving solid and gaseous phase, deliquescence and efflorescence, vapor pressure diagram of saturated solutions.

C. Binary liquid systems, partially miscible liquid pairs, their t-c diagrams and CST, effect of added salt and pressure on CST. Completely miscible liquid pairs. Ideal and non-ideal solutions, non-ideality of solutions, vapour pressure-composition diagrams of ideal and non-ideal solutions, Duhem Margules equation, principle of fractional distillation, t-x diagrams of binary liquid mixtures, azeotropes.

D. Distribution law, its thermodynamic derivation, validity and limitation, applications of distribution law, determination of equilibrium constant, solvent extraction.

e) Three- component system: introductory idea about triangular phase diagrams.

 

2.       Colloid Chemistry                                  

Colloid, crystaloid and suspenoid, classification of colloids and their distinctions, general methods of preparation and purification, properties of colloid, origin of colloidal charge, stability of colloids, coagulation of colloids, Hardy-Schulze rule, protective colloids, gold number, micelles formation and critical micelle concentration (CMC), importance and applications of colloids, determination of Avogadro no. Emulsions, types of emulsion, their preparation and properties, emulsifiers, stability of emulsion, importance and uses of emulsion.

Gels; types of gel, their preparation, properties and uses.

3.       Surface Chemistry

Adsorption, absorption and sorption, types of adsorption, solid surface and their characterization, adsorption on solid surfaces, techniques for measurements of adsorption on solid from the gas phase in solutions. Factors that influence adsorption of gases in solid, adsorption isotherm-nature of curves, Freundlich, Langmuir and BET isotherms, their validity, limitations and applications, enthalpy of adsorption.

Adsorption on the surface of liquid, surface films, Gibbs adsorption equation, surface activity and nature of surfactants, electrocapillary phenomenon.    

 

Books Recommended

1.       P.W. Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry

2.       Glasstone and Lewis

:

Text Book of Physical Chemistry

3.       A. Findlay

:

Phase rule

4.       S. Glasstone.

:

Physical Chemistry

5.       A.E. Alexander and Johnson

:

Colloidal Science

6.       B.Weiser

:

Text of Colloidal Chemistry

7.       G.M. Barrow

:

Physical Chemistry

8.       Maron and Lando

:

Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

 
 
 
 
Course: CHE-3112
Quantum Chemistry and Statistical Mechanics

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%,  Class Attendance 10%),     3 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 45

 

1.       Quantum Mechanics

Nature of classical mechanics, failure of classical mechanics, black body radiation, Plank’s quantum theory, heat capacity of solids, atomic spectra, Bohr and Sommerfield’s treatment, compton effect, photoelectric effect, Einstein’s explanation, De Broglie’s hypothesis, validity and limitation, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and its application.

2.       Quantum Chemistry

A. Schrodinger wave equation

Time independent and time dependent wave function: its significance and characteristics, normalization, orthogonalization.

Operators and observable

Definition of operator, rules of operator algebra, commutative properties, eigen value equation. Some important quantum mechanical operators: Laplacian, Hamiltonian, Hermitian and angular momentum operators, postulates of quantum mechanics.

B. Application of Schrodinger equation

Free particle in one dimension, particle in a box, solution and normalization of wave function, plots of Ψ vs x, probability calculation, particle in a three dimensional box, concept of degeneracy, one-dimensional simple harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor approximation.

Quantum mechanics for one electron system, Schrodinger equation for hydrogen like atoms, its solution, separation of R, Θ and Φ equation, solution of these equations, total wave functions for H-like atoms, radial distribution function, atomic orbital, significance of quantum numbers.

Quantum mechanics for many electron system approximation methods, the variation and perturbation method, 1st order perturbation of the normal helium atom and degenerate energy levels, application of variation technique to normal helium atom.

3.       Statistical Mechanics                                  

Basic concepts

System, assembly and ensemble, types of ensemble, macroscopic system, distribution of molecules, configuration, weight of configuration, population, most probable configuration, thermodynamic probability, entropy & thermodynamic probability, distribution of molecular velocities, statistical mechanical equilibrium, Stirling approximation, Boltzman distribution, partition function,  transnational, rotational and vibrational partition functions for diatomic molecules, ortho and para hydrogen, canonical ensemble, thermodynamic functions in terms of partition function, Sackur-Tetrode equation,  Bose-Einstein statistics, Fermi-Dirac statistics, Fermi energy, comparisons of M- B, B-E and F-D statistics.

Application of statistical mechanics

Derivation of ideal gas equation, heat capacities of solids, Einstein and Debye equations, chemical equilibrium, statistical treatment, evaluation of equilibrium constants.

 

Books Recommended:

1.       M.W. Hanna

:

Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry

2.       E.D. Kafman

:

Advanced Concepts in Physical Chemistry

3.       L.Pauling and E.B. Wilson

:

Introduction in Quantum Mechanics

4.       A.K. Chandra

:

Introduction of Quantum Mechanics

5.       P.W. Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry

6.       P.W. Atkins

:

Molecular Quantum Mechanics

7.       I.N. Levine

:

Quantum Chemistry

8.       Davidson

:

Statistical Thermodynamic

9.       Chandler

:

Introduction to statistical mechanics

10.        K.J. Laider

:

Chemical Kinetics

 

 

 

 

Course: CHE-3121

Organic Reaction Mechanism

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%);             3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1. Substitution Reaction                                                         

1.1      Nucleophilic Substitution at Saturated Carbons                   

Mechanism of SN1, SN2 and SNi reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics and stereochemistry, effect of structure, solvent, leaving, attacking and neighboring groups in substitution reactions.

1.2      Electrophilic substitution in Aromatic Systems

Electrophilic substitution in benzene, formation of π and σ-complexes, electrophilic substitution in monosubstituted benzene.

1.3  Nucleophilic substitution in aromatic system

Nucleophilic substitution in pyridine and diazonium salts, nucleophilic substitution in substituted benzene through benzene intermediates.

2.  Addition Reactions                                                           

2.1 Electrophilic Addition to Carbon-Carbon Double Bonds

 Mechanism of hydrogenation, hydration, hydroxylation, hydroboration, ozonolysis. 1,2 and 1,4-additions, their stereochemistry, kinetics and thermodynamics.

2.2      Nucleophilic Addition to Carbonyl Compounds:

Addition reaction to carbonyl compounds; conjugated system like conjugated dienes and conjugated unsaturated carbonyl compounds, effect of structure on reactivity.

3.   Elimination reactions                                                                      

 E1 and E2 reactions, stereoselectivity of E2 reactions, mechanism ElcB reaction, orientation in E2 reaction, elimination vs. substitution reaction, Saytzeff vs. Hofmann product in elimination reactions.

4.   Formation and Reaction of Esters and Related Compounds   

 Acyl-oxygen and hydrolysis, reactivity in the hydrolysis and formation of esters, formation and hydrolysis of amides.

5.   Mechanism of Some Important Reaction                   

Aldol condensation, Benzoin condensation, Cannizzaro reaction, Perkin reaction, Diels -Alder reaction, Michael reaction, Mannich reaction, Reformatsky reaction, Wittig reaction, Reimer-Tiemann reaction, Rosenmund reduction, Meerwein- Pronndrf-Varley reduction, Clemmensen reduction, and Wolf-Kishner reduction; Oppenauer oxidation reaction.

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       Peter Sykes

:

A Guide book to Mechanism in Organic Chemistry

2.       Raj K. Bansal

:

Organic Reaction Mechanism

3.       Jerry March

:

Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reaction and Reagent

4.       R. T. Morrison and R. N. Boyd

:

Organic Chemistry

 

Course: CHE-3122

Bioorganic Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%),             3 Credit points; Number of Lectures – 45

 

1. Carbohydrates

Definition, classification, constitution and configuration of on monosaccharides, synthesis of monosaccharides, ring structure of monosaccharides and their conformations, actions of acids and bases on reducing sugars, epimers, anomers and anomeric configurations, introduction of disaccharides and poly saccharides, structure determination of maltose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose and starch. Introduction of microbial polysaccharides.

2. Amino acids, peptides and proteins

Definition, sources classification and importance of amino acids, structure and configuration of amino-acids, isolation and characterization of amino acid from their mixture, isoelectric point, preparations and reactions of amino-acid, biosynthesis of amino acids, Peptides, its occurrence constitution and geometry, C-terminal and N-terminal residues of peptides. Proteins: classification and functions, denatured and conjugated proteins, primary and secondary structure of proteins. Estimation of protein.

3. Lipids and Nucleic acids

Definition, occurrence, classification and function, composition of fats and oils, hydrolysis of fats, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Definition, sources, importance, structure of nucleic acid, nucleosides, nucleotides, DNA, and RNA.

4. Urides and Purines

Chemistry of purines and uric acid, purine derivatives and xanthene bases.

 

Books recommended

1.         R.T Morrison & R.N Boyd,   Organic Chemistry, Study Guide to organic Chemistry, Prentice Hall

2.         T.W.G. Solomon, Organic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons.

3.         D.S Bahl and A. Bahl, Advanced Organic Chemistry, S. Chand & Co,. Ltd. New Delhi.

4.         I.L. Finar, Organic Chemisrty, Vol. 1 & 2, Longmans, Greenh & Co.

5.         A. Streitweiser,, C.H. Heathcock and E.M. Kosower, Introduction to Organic Chemistry, Macmillan Pub.Co.

6.         W.H. Brown and C.S. Foote, Organic Chemistry, Saunders College Pub.

7.         R.W.Griffin Jr., Modern Organic Chemistry,McGrwaw Hill.

8          Guthric and Honeyman,An Introduction to Carbohydrate Chemistry, Oxford University Press.

9.         O.P. Agarwal, Chemistry ofOrganic Natural Products, Vo—I & II, Goel Publishing.

 

 

Course: CHE-3131

Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)              3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1.       Atomic and Nuclear Structure 

Wave nature of electron, wave function, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, Schrodinger wave equation, Eigen values and eigen functions, application of Schrodinger wave equation to the hydrogen atom, Schrodinger equation for a particle confined in one dimensional and three dimensional box. The interpretation of the wave function Ψ, radial and angular functions, orbitals and probability distribution, physical significance of the s, p, d orbitals, energy levels of the atomic orbitals, polyelectron atom, electron spin, effective nuclear charge and shielding.

2.       Covalent Bonding

Bond polarity, dipoles, dipole moments, energetic of bond formation and its stability, potential energy diagram, Valence bond theory (VBT), limitation of VBT, valence bond treatment of H2 molecule, Hetler-London treatment and some improvements, Molecular orbital theory(MOT), construction of molecular orbitals by LCAO method, bonding, antibonding and nonbonding molecular orbitals, bonding in H2 and simple homonuclear diatomic molecules, MO diagrams for heteronuclear diatomic molecules and simple polyatomic molecules, comparison of the VBT and MOT, delocalisation of bonding electrons, HOMO and LUMO orbitals, superiority of MOT over the VBT, mixing of molecular orbitals and the correlation diagrams.

3.       Ionic Bonding            

Definition, energetics of ionic bond formation, stabilization of ions in crystal, Madelung constant,  lattice energy and its significance, ionic radii and ionic structures,  radius ratio effect, packing of ions in crystals.

4.       Bonding in Metals

Metallic bond, electron sea model, band theory of metals, metallic properties, conductors, semiconductors and insulations, solid solution, supper structure and intermetallic compounds, formation of interstitial phases, nonstoichiometric compounds, porous materials cohesive energies of metals.

5.       Hydrogen Bonding

Types of hydrogen bonding, theory of hydrogen bonds, properties explained by hydrogen bonding, importance of hydrogen bond, effect of H-bonding on physical and chemical properties of compounds, dimerisation of acids, structure of ice and HF.

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       F A Cotton and G Wilkinson

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

2.       James E. Huheey, Keiter and Keiter; Harper Collins

:

Inorganic Chemistry

3.       F A Cotton, G Wilkinson and P L Gaus

:

Basic Inorganic Chemistry

4.       D F Shriver, P W Atkins, C H Langfordz

:

Inorganic Chemistry

5.       T Moeller

:

Inorganic Chemistry

6.       Cartmel and Fowls

:

Valence and Molecular Structure

7.       G Wulfsberg

:

Principles of Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

8.       S Z Haider

:

Introduction to Modern Inorganic Chemistry

 

 

Course: CHE-3141

Chemical Process Industries-I (Inorganic)

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%,  Class Attendance 10%), 2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1. Fundamentals in the Development of Chemical Process Industries

Some chemical process industries with typical products and their uses, the systematic analysis of chemical processes, flow sheet, raw materials, by products wastes, general aspects of localization of chemical process industries.

2. Chlor-alkali Industries

Manufacture of soda ash, sodium bicarbonate, caustic soda, chlorine and bleaching powder and their importance.

3. Fertilizer Industries

Nitrogen fixation, manufacture of ammonia, urea, triple super phosphate, potassium fertilizer, NKP fertilizer.

4. Cement Industries

Cement and its classification, definition of portland cement and its types, manufacture of  portland cement, setting and hardening of cement, testing of cement. Cement industries in Bangladesh.

5. Glass and Ceramics industries:

Definition, composition and classification, raw materials, chemical reaction for glass formation, manufacturing steps, glass furnaces and their operations, some special glasses; annealing, manufacture of special glasses. Glass industries in Bangladesh.

6. Mineral acids

Raw materials and manufacture of nitric acid, sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid, industrial uses of mineral acids.

7. Metallurgy of iron

a) Principle of metallurgy

Classification of elements as metal, non metal and metalloids, characteristics and occurrence of metals, definitions of minerals, ores, gangue, flux, slag, metallurgy, ore dressing by physical and chemical methods.

b) Manufacture of iron and steel

Blast furnace, production of pig iron with special reference to raw materials, blast furnace design and operation, chemical reaction involved, by products and their utilization, different processes for steel manufacture and their comparison influence of minor elements in steel.

 

 

 

 

 

Books Recommended

1.    T Austin

:

Shreve’s Chemical Process Industries

2.    J A Kent

:

Reagel’s Hand Book of Industrial Chemistry

3.    B K Sharma

:

Industrial Chemistry

 

 

 

Course: CHEL-3110

Physical Chemistry Lab-II

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);    3 Credit points

 

1.       Determination of the distribution of random errors

  1. To study the variation of viscosity of a pure liquid with temperature and determine the temperature coefficient of viscosity of the liquid.
  2. To determine the radius of the glycerin molecule by viscosity measurements.
  3. To determine the heat of hydration of CuSO4 (i.e. the heat of crystallization of CuSO4.5H2O).

5.       Study of partially miscible system in presence and absence of impurities.

6.       Study of phase diagrams for two-component system.

  1. To determine the equivalent conductance of a strong electrolyte at several dilutions and verify the Onsagar equation.

8.       Study of the distribution equilibria of benzoic acid between two immiscible solvents

9.       Determination of the activity coefficient of electrolytes by conductivity measurements

10.    Determination of the relative molar mass of a solute by measuring the depression of freezing point

11.    Investigation of the effect of temperature on the rate of reduction of the permanganate ion by the ethanedioate ion in the presence of acid.

 

Book Recommended:

     1. B.P. Levitt       :        Findlay’s practical Physical Chemistry     

 

 

Course: CHEL-3120

Laboratory Synthesis of Organic Compounds

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);    3 Credit points

 

1.    Organic preparations involving typical reactions: Diels-alder reaction, Perkin reaction, Grignard reaction, Friedel-Crafts reactions, permanganate and chromic acid oxidation, esterification etc.

2.     Preparation of (i) acetanilide, (ii) benzoic acid, (iii) nitrobenzene, (iv) p-nitroacetanilide, (v) p-nitroaniline (vi) aspirin, (vii) cyclohexanone from cyclohexanol (viii) 3-aminoacetophenone from reduction of 3-nitroacetophenone with Sn/HCI (ix) dibenzalacetones (some other synthesis may also be included if facilities are made available).

3.     Aromatic substitution:

(a) Bromination of acetanilide and phenol

(b) Sulphonation of aniline

(c) Diazotization of aromatic amines and preparation of

i)      Phenols

ii)    halobenzenes

iii)   Azodyes.  

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       A. I. Vogel

:

Elementary Practical Organic Chemistry,

Part-I, Small Scale Preparation

Part-II, Qualitative Organic Analysis

Part-III, Quantitative Organic Analysis

2.        A. I.Vogel

:

A Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry

3.       Shriner, Fusion and Curtin

:

The Systematic Identification of Organic Compounds

4.       H.T. Clarke & B. Haynes

:

A Hand Book of Organic Analysis

 

 

 

 

3rd Year 2nd Semester

Course: CHE-3211
Chemical kinetics and Catalysis

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)                3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1.       Chemical kinetics

The rates of reaction, rate law and rate constants, factors affecting rate of reaction, order of a reaction; zero order, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and fractional order reactions, their integrated rate and characteristics, determination of order of reaction, determination of the rate of slow reaction, conventional chemical methods, conductance, colorimetric and spectrophotometric methods, methods based on gas pressure and volume measurements, molecularity of a reaction, brief description of chain reaction.

Temperature dependence of reaction rate, Arrhenius equation of activation, potential energy surface, collision theory of reaction rate, its success and failure, modified collision theory, elementary treatment of transition state theory.

Activated complex theory, statistical approach to reaction dynamics, derivation of rate equation for bimolecular gaseous reaction, transmission coefficient, quantum mechanical tunneling, thermodynamic formulation of rate equation, Eyring equation.

Reaction mechanism and kinetic studies, rate determining step and steady state approximation, kinetic studies of decomposition of ozone, N2O5, decomposition of phosgene, acetaldehyde, ethane. Chain reaction: mechanism, explosion and explosions limit.

2.       Catalysis

Characteristics, classification, homogeneous catalysis, acid-base catalysis, effect of pH, enzyme

catalysis: Michalis-Menten equation, heterogeneous catalysis; Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Hinshelwood Rideal mechanism.

 

Books Recommended

 

11.    K.J. Laider

:

Chemical Kinetics

12.    J.I.Steinfeld, J.S. Fransisco and W.L.Hase

:

Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics

13.    Robinson and K.A. Holbrook

:

Unimolecular Reaction

14.    C.N. Hinshelwood

 

Kinetics of Chemical Change

 

 

Course: CHE-3221

Natural Product Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%); 2 Credit point; Number of Lectures - 30

 

1. Alkaloids

Occurrence, classification, test of alkaloids, extraction and purification of alkaloids, general methods of determining the structure, chemistry of ephedrine, nicotine, and atropine.

2. Terpenoids

Terpenes and terpenoids, the essential oils, classification of terpenes, isoprene and special isoprene rule, isolation, purification and general methods of determining structures of terpenes, detailed studies of some terpenes: citral, and limonene.

3. Steroids

Introduction of steroids, nomenclature and functions of steroids, cholesterol and its effect in biological systems.

4. Organic Coloring Materials

Isolation, purification and structure of anthocyanines, flavonoids and carotenoids. Naturally occurring colored compounds: chlorophyll and hemoglobin.

 

Books Recommended

1.       O. P. Agarwal

:

Chemistry of Organic Natural Products,  Vol I and II

2.       Guthric and  Homeyman 

:

An Introduction to carbohydrate Chemistry

3.       Gurdeep Chatwal

:

Organic chemistry of natural products, Vol-I and II

4.       I. L. Finar

:

Organic Chemistry Vol. II

5.       T. Morrison and R.N. Boyd

:

Organic Chemistry

Course: CHE-3222

Medicinal Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%,  Class Attendance 10%),   2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.    Synthesis of Some Important Organic Drugs

Drug and its Classification, mode of action of some important drugs e.g. sulphadrugs, antimalarials etc.

1.1     Sulphadrugs: Sulphanilamide, sulphapyridine, sulphathiazole, sulphadiazine, sulphamethazine, sulphaguanidine, sulbutamol, prontosil, chloramine-T, acetazolamide.

1.2     Antimalrials: Pamaquine, mepacrine, chloroquine and paludrine.

1.3     Fever Sinking Drugs: Paracetamol, aspirin, phenacetin.

1.4     Sweetening Agent: Saccharine and dulcin.

2.       Chemical and Biological Aspects of the Following Drugs

2.1     Anesthetics: Cocaine, ecgonine, procaine, tetracacine, lidocaine.

2.2     Anticancer Agents: Busulfan, mechloromethamine, 5- flurouracil

3.       Antibiotics

Definition, chemistry of penicillin, chloromycetin, streptomycin, ampicillin, amoxycillin, cloxacillin, floxacillin.

4.       Vitamins

Definition, pro-vitamin, chemistry of vitamin. A1, B1, B2, and C.

 

 Books Recommended

1.       Norman Evers, Demis Caldwell, Ernest Benn 

:

The Chemistry of Drugs

2.       A. Kargaryer 

:

Medical chemistry

3.       I. L. Finar

:

Organic Chemistry Vol-II.        

4.       Alfred Burger     

:

Medicinal Chemistry

5.       Bertram and Katzung 

:

Basic and Clinical Pharmacology

6.       A. Kar

:

Medicinal Chemistry

 

 

 

Course: CHE-3231

Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%),             3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

                                              

1. Structures and Isomers in Coordination Compounds

Coordination compounds, ligands, types of ligands, nomenclature of coordination compounds, 18-electron rule, isomerism in coordination compounds, types of isomerism, stereochemistry of 4 and 6- co-ordination complexes, chelate complexes,  inner complexes, application of coordination complexes.

2. Bonding in Coordination Compounds   

Coordination bond, Werner postulates and its limitation, Sidwick’s electronic concept and its limitation,  crystal field theory, orbital splitting in octahedral, tetrahedral and square planner complexes, magnitudes of 10Dq, factors affecting the magnitude of 10Dq, application of crystal field theory, failure of CFT, ligand field theory, spectrochemical series, high spin and low spin complexes, Jahn-Taller effect, magnetic moments, origin of colour, comparison between VBT and CFT, molecular orbital theory for octahedral complexes.

 

3. Metal carbonyls and Related Complexes

Synthesis, structures and bonding of metal carbonyls compounds, physical and chemical properties, anionic and cationic carbonyls, derivatives of carbonyls, carbonyl hydrides and carbonyl halides. Metallic nitrosyls complex: synthesis, structures and bonding of metal nitrosyls compounds, linear and bent metal nitrosyls complexes,role of NO and CO in the human body.

4. Reactions and Mechanisms in Coordination Chemistry 

Inert and labile compounds, substitution reaction, types of substitution reaction,  mechanism of nucleophilic substitution reaction in octahedral and square-planar complexes, stepwise formation of complexes, stepwise formation constant and overall formation constants, stability constant, factors affecting the stability of complexes,  the chelate effect, definition and theories of trans effect, synthesis of trans isomer, fluxionality, inner and outer sphere reactions, template reactions.

5. Transition Metal Organometallics         

Introduction, classification of ligands, 18-elactron rule, synthesis, bonding, structure and properties of alkyl, alkene, allyl and cyclopentdienyl complounds, diene and arene compounds. Sandwiches of non-transition elements.

6. Organometallics and Catalysis

Heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, stoichoimetric reactions, protonation, oxidative addition, reductive elimination and insertion reactions, catalytic reactions water gas shift reactions, Fisher-Tropsch synthesis, hydroformylation reaction; Wilkinson’s catalyst: hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds, Ziegler-Natta polymerisation.

 

Books Recommended

 

  1. F.A. Cotton and G. Wilkinson

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

  1. D.F. Shriver and P.W. Atkins

:

Inorganic Chemistry

  1. Huheey, Keiter and Keiter

:

Inorganic Chemistry

  1. S.Z Haider

:

Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

  1. Cotton, Wilkinson and Gauss

:

Basic Inorganic Chemistry

 

 

Course: CHE-3241

Chemical Process Industries-II (Organic)

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%),    2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1. Pulp and Paper Industries

Cellulose and its sources, pulp and its classifications, manufacture of pulp by different processes, recovery of black liquor, manufacture of paper from pulp, paper de-inking, rag pulp, paper industry in Bangladesh.

2. Sugar and Starch Industries

Manufacture of sugar from sugar cane and sugar beat, refining of raw sugar, utilization of byproducts of sugar industry, sugar industries in Bangladesh, production of starch from corn production of glucose and dextrin from starch, miscellaneous starch.

3. Natural Oils, Fats and waxes

Sources, classification, extraction & refining of vegetable oils, analysis of fats and oils and their uses, hydrogenation of oils.

4. Soap and Detergents

Methods of fat splitting, manufacture of laundry and toilet soaps, recovery and refining of glycerin, cleansing action of soap.

Detergents: Definition, classification and their manufacture, comparison between soap and detergent, biodegradability of detergent.

5. Fermentation Industries

Enzymes and their actions, manufacture of industrial alcohol and absolute alcohol, principle and production of butyl alcohol, citric acid vinegar by fermentation process.

6. Fuels

Solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, Coal and its constituents, different stages of coal formation analysis and calorific value of coal and other fuels, carbonization, distillation of coal tar, hydrogenation of coal, manufacture of producer gas and water gas, refining and distillation of crude oil, motor and aviation fuels, thermal and catalytic cracking, production of motor fuels by alkylation, cyclization and polymerization, lubricating agents, hydrocarbons and petroleum, their distribution in Bangladesh, methods of harnessing hydrocarbons in Bangladesh, petrochemicals from liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons, natural gas and its composition, purification and utilization.

7. Paints and Varnishes

Constituents of paints, varnishes, lacques, enamels and printing inks and their functions, paints and pigments and their manufacture, differentiation between paints and varnishes.    

    

Books Recommended:

 

1.       R.N shreve

:

Chemical process industries

2.       B.K. Sharma

:

Industrial chemistry

3.       S.M. Nurul H. Bhuiyan

:

Shilparasharyan O Rashayanik Projukti

4.       Andersen and Wensel

:

Introduction to chemical Engineering

5.       R.K. Das

:

Industrial Chemistry, Vols I & II

6.       Rozers

:

Manual of Industrial Chemistry

Course: CHE-3251

Chemical Spectroscopy-I

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)             3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1.       Electromagnetic Radiation

The nature of electromagnetic radiation, emission and absorption spectra, spectrometers, basic components of depressive spectrometers, modulation technique, transmittance and absorbance, representation of spectra, spectral peaks, intensities, width and resolution, signal to noise ratio and signal averaging Fourier transform technique and its advantages.

2.       Atomic Spectroscopy

Origin of atomic spectra, production (or methods of exciting) atomic spectra, coupling of spin and orbital angular moments, notation of spectral terms, terms symbols, selection rules for transition, fine structure of spectral line, atomic spectral of hydrogen and hydrogen like elements, effect of magnetic field on atomic spectra, hyper final structure, isotope effect on the spectra of elements, methods of identification and determination of elements by emission spectroscopy.

3.       Rotational Spectroscopy

Rotation of molecules and their classification, interaction of rotating molecules with microwave radiation, rotational spectrometer, rotational energies of rigid diatomic rotator, rotational energy levels, transitions, selection rules and rotational spectra, intensity of rotational spectral lines, isotopic substitution effect in rotational spectra, calculation of bond distance from MW spectroscopy, centrifugal distortion and non-rigid rotors, symmetric top molecules, their rotational energy and spectra, Stark’s effect.

4.       Vibrational Spectroscopy

Vibration in molecules: normal modes, harmonic and anharmonic, potential energy diagrams, Morse equation, vibrational energy, dissociation energy of diatomic molecules, population of vibrational levels, transition probabilities, fundamental, overtone and hot band, transition combination and difference bands, Fermi resonance, vibration-rotation spectra of gaseous molecules, P, Q and R branches, parallel and perpendicular vibrations, Infra-red spectra of poly atomic molecules, characteristic group vibrations and skeletal vibration, shifts in group frequencies, techniques, radiation sources, optics, monochromator, sample holders, defectors for infrared spectrometers, handling of samples: gaseous , liquid and solid samples.

5.       Ultraviolet and Visible Spectroscopy

Electronic states of molecules, Born-Oppenheimer approximation, electronic spectra of diatomic molecules, vibrational course structure in electronic bands, rotational fine structure of electronic bands, Franck-Condon principle and intensities of spectral lines. Dissociation energy, predissociation.

Spectra of species in condensed phase, various electronic transitions in organic and inorganic species, width of electronic bands, effect of solvent on band width and band position, chromospheres, bathochromic and hyperchromic shifts, auxocromes.

6.       NMR Spectroscopy

Nuclear spin, properties of nuclei in a magnetic field, Larmor precission, conditions of magnetic resonance, relaxation procceses, NMR spectrometer, electron density of the nuclear, chemical shift, and scales, the coupling of nuclear spins coupling constant, exchange phenomenon in chemical analysis by NMR technique, solvent effect, prediction of NMR spectra of compounds, application of NMR spectroscopy.

 

Books Recommended:

 

1.       A.K. Chanda

:

Introduction of Quantum Mechanics

2.       M.W. Hanna

:

Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry

3.       P.W. Atkins

:

Physical Chemistry

4.       L.Pauling and E.B.Wilsor

:

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

5.       M.R. Awode

:

Quantum Chemistry

6.       C.N. Banwell &  E.M. Mecash

:

Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy

7.       G.M. Barrow

:

Introduction to Molecules

8.       T. Michael Hollas

:

Modern Spectroscopy

9.       Hertzbery

:

Spectra of Diatrnic molecules

10.    Rao

:

Ultraviolet & Visible Spectroscopy

11.    Bellamy

:

The Infrared Spectra of Complex molecules

 

 

 

 

Course: CHEL-3210

Physical Chemistry Lab-III

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);    3 Credit point.

 

01. Study of partially miscible system in presence and absence of impurities.

02. Study of phase diagrams for two-component system.

03. Determination of cooling curves of binary solid system.

04. Determination of the adsorption isotherm of acetic acid/oxalic acid from aqueous solution by charcoal.

05. Determination of the dissociation constant of a weak acid by conductance measurement.

06. Potentiometric titration involving oxidation-reduction reaction and acid-base neutralizations.

07. Determination of partition coefficient and equilibrium constant of a reaction.

08.Determination of molecular association and dissociation.

09. Determination of the standard electrode potential of zinc and copper.

10. Determination of the absorption curve of a coloured substance in solution & to study the validity of Beer-Lambert law.

11. Determination of the specific reaction rate of alkaline hydrolysis of an ester by the conductance method.

12. Determination of specific rotation of the inversion of sucrose in the presence of an acid by polarimetry.

13. Measurement of EMF and standard electrode potential.

14. Study of pH titration.

 

Books Recommended:

 

1.       A. Findlay

:

Practical Physical Chemistry

2.       A. Faraday

:

Practical Physical Chemistry

3.       Daricl, Mathews and William

:

Experimental Physical Chemistry

4.       J. M. Wison, R.J Newcomd, A.R.Denoro, R.M.W.Rickett.

:

Experiment in Physical Chemistry

5.       Palit

:

Practical Physical Chemistry

6.       Sharma

:

Practical Physical Chemistry

 

 

Course: CHEL-3240

Chemical Process Industries Lab-I (Inorganic)

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance-10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research-20);    3 Credit points.

 

A.   Industrial Chemistry Experiments

1..   Determination of chloride content in water by Hg (II) nitrate method.

2.   Determination of dissolved O2 in water by -NaOH-MnSO4 method.

3.    Measurement of pH and conductivity of water.

4.   Determination of Fe content in an iron tablet,

5.    Determination of  total hardness of supplied water.

6.   Determination of total arsenic, As (lII) + As(V), in a groundwater sample

7.   Determination of calcium in eggshell.

 8.   Analysis of fertilizers (a) phosphate, (b) nitrate, and (c) sulphate.

 

B.  Preparation of Inorganic Compound:

1.  Preparation of some compounds of pharmaceutical importance (a) Calcium gluconate (b) Magnesium hydroxide  

     (c)  Aluminium  hydroxide gel (d) Magnesium Sulphate (e) Magnesium trisilicate

2.   Cu (i) thiourea complex & Determination of CuSO4 & thiourea independaty 

     [Cr.3en]ICl3 and [Cr.Zen2Cl] Cl

 

C. Analytical:

1.      Separation of metals & by PC & TLC

2.      Ion exchange Chromatographic separation and determination of Fe(III) & Cu(II) ; Co (II) and NI (II) in a mixture.

 

Books Recommended:

1.       A.I. Vogel

:

Qualitative Organic Analysis

2.       A.I. Vogel

:

Quantitative Organic Analysis

3.       Stock and Rice

:

Chromatographic Methods

 

Course: CHEV-3200

Viva-voce

50 Marks; 2 Credit point

Viva-voce examination includes the assessment of the students through oral examination of all the courses studied in the 3rd Year.

 

4th Year 1st Semester

 

Course: CHE-4111
Polymer Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

 

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)              3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1.       Polymer

Difference between polymers & macromolecules, polymerization, degree of polymerization, high and low polymer, classification of polymers, on the basis of source, on the basis of thermal properties, on the basis of synthesis, forms of polymer, different types of polymerization, addition, condensation, ring opening polymerization and co-polymerization, cross linking of polymers.

2.       Addition polymerization

Mechanism and kinetics of free radical polymerization, monomers & initiators, dependence of rate on the initiator & monomer concentrations, degree of polymerization and kinetic chain length, factors affecting chain polymerization, chain transfer,Ionic addition polymerization: cationic and anionic, mechanism and kinetics of cationic & anionic polymerization.

3.       Condensation Polymerization

Types of polycondensation reactions, techniques of condensation polymerization, mechanism and kinetics of catalyzed and noncatalyzed polycondesation, carothers relation, distinction between addition and condensation polymerization. Carother’s equation.

4.  Copolymerization

Mechanism and kinetics of binary free radical copolymerization, applications of copolymer composite equation, determination of monomer  reactivity ratio, monomer and radical reactivity, ionic copolymerization, step copolymerization.

5.      Polymer Solution

Criteria for polymer solubility, size and shapes of polymers in solution. Thermodynamics of polymer solution: Process of polymer dissolution, thermodynamic relation for simple polymer solution, enthalpy, entropy and free energy of mixing, Flory-Huggins theory of polymer solution.

 

6.    Molecular Weight, Size and Shape of Polymer Molecules

Average molecular weight: Number average, weight average and viscosity average molecular weights, degree of polymerization, polydispersity and molecular weight distribution in polymers, determination of molecular weight of polymers, end group analysis, colligative methods, light scattering method, ultracentrifuge and viscosity method.

 

7.  Preparation, Properties and Uses of Some Important Polymers

Polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride. (PVC), polystyrene, polybutylene, polybutadiene-styrene (neoprene), polymethyl methacrylate, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylacetate, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyamides (nylon 6, nylon -6,6, nulon-11)

Books Recommended:     

                               

2.       Flory

:

Principles of Polymer Chemistry

3.       Bilmeyer

:

Text book of Polymer Science

4.       Guariker

:

Text Book of Polymer Science

5.       Padmal L. Nayak, S. Lenka  

:

Text Book of Polymers Science

6.       R.B Seymour

:

Introduction to Polymer Chemistry

7.       D. Margerison, G. C. East

:

Introduction of Polymer Chemistry

8.       M.G. Arora, M. Singh

:

Polymer Chemistry

9.       Synthetic organic Polymer

:

Guavilaar

10.    Industrial Chemistry

:

Sharma

Course: CHE-4112
Photochemistry

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%),    2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       Photochemistry                                                                             

A.  Nature of Electromagnetic radiation: thermal or dark reaction, radiation induced reaction- photochemical reactions, distinction between thermal and photochemical reactions,  light absorption, Beer-Lamberts law, its validity, deviation from Beer-Lamberts law, laws of photochemistry, quantum yield- high & low values, experimental determination of quantum yield, factors affecting quantum yield, photochemical processes, primary and secondary light absorption processes, potential energy curves for primary processes, Franck Condon principle, secondary processes, singlet and triplet states, their characteristics, fates of electronically excited molecules, fluorescence, types of fluorescence. Phosphorescence and its application, factor affecting fluorescence & phosphorescence.

B.  Quenching, Mechanism of quenching, collisional quenching of fluorescence, kinetics of collisional quenching, comparisons of fluorescence and phosphorescence, mechanism and kinetics of photochemical reactions, hydrogen halogen reactions, dimerization of anthracene, formation of phosgene, photosensitization, natural photosensitization,  photochemical equilibrium, flash photolysis, luminescence, chemiluminescence, some photochemical reactions- photo addition, photo dissociation, photo ionization etc. Formation and depletion of ozone layer in the stratosphere, application of photochemical processes.

 

Books Recommended

1.       K.J. Laidlar

:

Chemical kinetics

2.       K.K Rohati Mukhargee

:

Fundamentals Photochemistry

3.       C.H.J Wells

:

Introduction to Molecular Photochemistry

4.       R.P Wayne

:

Principles and Application of Photochemistry

5.       D.N. Bajpai

:

Advance Physical Chemistry 

 

 

Course: CHE-4122

Fundamentals of Pharmaceuticals Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%),             3 Credit points; Number of Lectures – 45

 

1.         Introduction :  Pharmaceutical process: raw material, classification, testing, Procurement, Importance of pharmaceutical Chemical chemicals and processing of pharmaceutical chemical and processing of pharmaceutical products, equipments.

 

2.         Pharmacopeia: Introduction, BP, USP, EUP, INN.

 

3.         Pharmacopeia Analysis: Principle underlying qualitative and quantitative pharmaceutical analysis, Significance of qualitative analysis in pharmaceutical quality assurance and quality control, Theory and Basic concepts of GMP, ISO 9000,ISO 9001, TQM, (a) Titrametric  Analysis: Acid base titration in pharmaceutical analysis, Redox titration: iodometry and iodimetry, Application in pharmaceutical analysis, (b) Non aqueous titration: principles and application, (c) Instrumental analysis: UV, IR, HPLC; Application in drug analysis, (e) Microbiological assay: principle and applications (specific examples), Sterility and pyrogen Testing.

 

4.         Unit Process and Unit Operation in Pharmaceutical Chemistry : Desing, construction and safety measure of pharmaceutical manufacturing plant; Principles involved and technique employed in drying, granulation, missing and clarification; Filtration, milling distillation, control of humidity, refrigeration, air conditioning, piping and stages, GMP and GMT.

5.         Pharmaceutics:

            (a) Tablet: Definition, formulation and compounding; Wet and dry granulation methods, slugging and capping of tablets, Coating of tablets, Disintegration and Dissolution test for compresses tablets, Essential qualities of good tablets.

           

            (b) Capsule: Materials for production of hard gelatin capsules, Methods of capsule filling, Importance evaluation of capsules.

           

            (c) Ointments: Definition and classification, Factors affecting skin absorption, Ointments bases, Preparation of ointments including dermatological preparation.

           

            (d) Parenteral Products: Definition and types of parenteral products, Vehicles for products, Cleaning equipments and preparation of parenteral products including clarification, Filling, sterilization, sealing and capping, Control requirements for paranteral products, Pyrogen tests, Sterility test, Foreign particles, Inspection for leakage, Identity, labeling, storage, Administration of parenteral products.

           

            (e) Emulsion and Aerosols: Definition and classification, Theory of  emulsions, Emulsifications and emulsifying agents, Types of emulsifying agents, Sedimentation testing, preparing equipments, Packing and storge, (b) Internal and External Liquid: Preparations of different types of Syrups, Elixirs, Compounding of internal and external liquids, Liquids manufacturing; The hydrophilic and lyophilic system.

 

Books recommended :

1.         E.W. Martin, Hussa’s Phaqrmaceutical; Dispending, Mack Publishing. Co.

2.         A. Burger, Medicinal Chemistry and drug Discovert, Wiley- Interscience.

3.         A.I. Vogel, A Text Book of Practical Organic Chemistry, Prentice Hall.

4.         Curtin, Shriner and Fusion, Systematic Organic Analysis, Wiley.

5.         B.G Katzsung, Basic and Clinical pharmacology, 9th edition, McGraw-Hill, New York.

6.         L. Lachman, The Theory and Practice of Industrial Pharmacy, 3rd Indian edition. Varghese Publishing House, Bombay.

7.         W.O. Foye, Principles of Medicinal Chemistry, 3rd edition, Barghese Publishing House, Bombay.

8.         A. White, P. Handler and E.L. Smith, Principles of Biochemistry, McGraw-Hill.

9.         M. Mesbahuddin and M.R. Islsm, General Principles of Pharmacology, Bengal Library, Dhaka.

 

 

Course: CHE-4151

Chemical Spectroscopy-II

Examination: 2 hours

 

50 Marks: Theory 70% Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%), 2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1.       UV-visible Spectra of Organic Compounds

Woodward- Hoffmann rules for the calculation of λ- max, solvent effects on band position, conjugated system, chromophores, and applications of uv-visible spectroscopy.

  1. IR Spectra of Organic Compounds

Characteristic group frequencies, assignment of spectral bands, structural factors including common organic functional groups affecting group frequencies, frequency shifts associated with structural changes in the compounds containing hetero atoms, applications in structure elucidation.

  1. NMR Spectroscopy

Nuclear spin, common nuclei with spin (1H, 13C, 15N, 19F, 31P), interaction of magnetic field with nuclear spin, Larmour precession, resonance absorption of radiation, the nmr spectrophotometer, nmr spectrum, chemical shift: shielding and deshielding of nuclei, spin-spin coupling, coupling constant, vicinal, geminal, ortho and para coupling, proton exchange reactions, relaxation, spin decoupling, NOE, Fourier transform spectra, two-dimensional nmr COSY and NOESY.

  1. Mass spectroscopy

Techniques of ionizations: electron impact, fast atom bombardment, field desorption, photo ionization, multi photon ionization, thermal methods, principles of mass separation, quadruple mass separator, time of flight mass spectrometer, fragmentation of ions, rearrangement of ions, base peak, molecular mass determination, FAB mass spectroscopy.

5. Combination of spectroscopic methods [UV, IR, NMR (1H, 13C) EIMS and FAB- mass] in elucidating structures of compounds.

  

Books Recommended:

1.    D. L. Pavia, G. M. Lampman, G. S. Kriz

:

Introduction to Spectroscopy: A Guide for Students of Organic Chemistry

2.    R. M. Silverstein, G. C. Bassler, T. C. Morrill

:

Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds

3.    Y. R. Sharma

:

Elementary Organic Spectroscopy-Principles and Applications

4.    J. D. Garybeal

:

Molecular Spectroscopy

5.    P. S. Sindhu

:

Molecular Spectroscopy

6.    R. J. Abraham, P. Loftus

:

Proton and Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy

 

 
Course: CHE-4161
Environmental Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%),    2 Credit point; Number of Lectures- 30

 

1. Atmospheric Pollution

Composition of the atmosphere, atmospheric Structure, types of pollutants and their sources, environmental effects of the oxides of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur, hydrocarbons and ozone, metallic particulates in the atmosphere, the automobile as polluter, acid rain, green house effect, ozone layer depletion.

2. Water Pollution

Quality of natural water, quality parameter and standards, chemistry of water, sources of water pollution, classes of polluted water, measuring of dissolved oxygen, BOD, COD, DOC test, ocean damming, effects of pollution on the oceans, sewerage and its effects, trace elements, As, Pb and Hg in water.

3. Pesticides: Kinds of pesticides, behavior of pesticides in soil, organochlorine compounds, organophosphates and carbonates, effects of pesticides in the environment.

4. Sewage Treatment and Waste Management

Sewage and its composition, methods of sewage treatment, sources and classification of solid wastes, municipal, industrial and hazardous wastes, textile and leather wastewater treatment, ETP, pubic health aspects, methods of collection, disposal methods, recycling and re-use of solid wastes.

5. Soil pollution

Causes and effect of soil pollution, industrial wastes, urban water, radioactive pollutants, agricultural practices, chemical and metallic pollutants, biological agents, mining, resistant objects and soil sediment.

6. Noise pollution

Sources of noise pollution characteristics of sound, measurement of noise and noise level, types of noise, airs pollution and noise pollution, effect of noise pollution, prevention and control of noise pollution.

 

Books Recommended:

1.         S. E. Manahan

:

Environmental Chemistry

2.         A.K. Dey

:

Environmental Chemistry

3.        Colin Baird

:

Environmental Chemistry

4.        Roger Reeve

:

Environmental Analysis

5.       S.S Dara

:

Environmental Chemistry and Pollution Control S.S Dara

 

 

 

Course: CHE-4171

Analytical Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)             3 Credit point; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1. Statistical treatment and Analytical Data                   

Normal distribution and Gaussian curve, coefficient of variation, variance, relative standard deviation, the confidence limit, Tests of significance: F-test, students T-test, rejection of a result (the Q-test), sensitivity and detection limit of an instrument.

2. Sampling in Chemical Analysis                                                      

Sampling procedures, sample population, significance of representative sampling, decomposing and dissolving sample, separation of impurities from sample solution, precipitation, solvent extraction, ion-exchange method and chromatography.

3. Chromatography                                               

Chromatographic behavior of solute, retention behavior, partition coefficient, column efficiency, resolution, quantitative analysis, evaluation method, classification of chromatographic methods.

(i) Plane chromatography

Principle of paper chromatography (PC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC), nature of mobile phase, stationary phases, development, location of spot, quantitative methods, applications.

 

(ii) Liquid column chromatography

Principles, stationary phases, mobile phases and applications.

(iii)High performance Liquid chromatography (HPLC)

The HPLC system, solvent requirements, filtration and degassing, column, solvent pumping system, injection system, detectors and applications.

(iv) Gas Chromatography

Principles, supports: the stationary phase, the stationary (liquid) phase, carrier gas, sample ingection system, column, types of detectors, applications. GC-MS and its applications.

(v) ICP (Inductively coupled plasma)

ICP (Inductively coupled plasma), ICP-MS, ICP-AES

 (vi) Ion-exchange method

Principles, types of resin, structure, swelling, effect of pH, separation of metal ions, action of ion exchange resins, applications.

4. Complexometric Analysis

Complexes, formation constants, chelates, EDTA equilibria, effect of pH on EDTA equilibria, EDTA titration curves, types of EDTA titrations, selectivity, masking and demasking agents, metal ion indicators, applications.

5. Spectrochemical analysis                                                 

Beer-Lambert’s law and its limitations, instrumentation and operation of UV-Visible spectrophotometer, determination of concentration in solution, determination of pK value of an indicator, deviation from B-L law, chemical deviation, instrumental deviation, spectrophotometric titration, other applications of UV-Visible spectrophotometry.

6. Atomic Spectrophotometric Method                             

Emission spectroscopy, flame emission spectrometry, distribution between ground and excited states, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, principle, instrumentation, refractory compounds formation, fluorescence and phosphorescence, fluorophometer: construction, operation  and application.

 7. Thermal analysis

 Principles of diferential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG), methodology of DTA and TG with example,    applications.

 

 

Books Recommended:

1.       A.I  Vogel

:

A Textbook of Quantitative Analysis

2.       G.D Christion

:

Analytical Chemistry, 5th Ed

3.       D. Skoog, D.M. West and F.J. Holler

:

Fundamental of analytical chemistry, 5th Ed

4.       J.H Kennedy

:

Analytical chemistry principal

 

 

 

Course: CHEL-4120

Separation and Quantitative Estimation of Organic Compounds

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);    3 Credit point.

 

1. Quantitative Estimation of functional groups:

(i)                   Estimation of carboxylic acid group present in an organic compound by iodometric titration.

(ii)                 Estimation of hydroxyl and amino groups by acetylating.

(iii)                Estimation of carbonyl group by derivatization followed by gravimetric analysis

(iv)               Estimation of aldehyde group by oxidation (Using Fehling/Benedict solution).

(v)                 Estimation of adjacent hydroxyl groups by periodic oxidation.

(vi)                                  Quantitative analysis of Aspirin

(vii)              Determination of nicotine in tobacco.

(viii)                              Determination of ascorbic acid in Vitamin-C tablet

2. Separation of Organic compounds by chromatographic methods.

(A)     Thin-layer Chromatography (TLC): Preparation of thin layer plates, separation of mixture of colored compounds by TLC, separation of colorless compounds by TLC and detection of the separated compounds by UV light and iodine vapor, separation of colorless compounds by TLC and detection of the separated compounds by using charring reagent (vanillin-sulphuric acid reagent).

(B)     Column Chromatography (CC): (i) Separation of colored compounds by column chromatography using alumina silica gel as stationary phases, sample application as solution and by adsorbing the compounds in the adsorbent. (ii) Separation of one colored and another colorless compound by column chromatography.

(C)      Paper Chromatography (PC): (i) Identification free sugars by paper chromatography and detection of separated compounds by dipping spray reagents. (ii) Separation of free amino acids by paper chromatography and detection of the separated compounds ninhydrin spray reagent.

 

       Recommended Books:

1.       Shriner, Fusion & Curtin

:

Systematic Identification of Organic Compounds.

2.       A. I. Vogel

:

Practical Organic Chemistry

3.       Siggia

:

Quantitative Organic Analysis via Functional Groups

4.       Fritz & Hammond

:

Quantitative Organic Analysis

5.       K.L. Williamson

:

Macro-scale and Micro-scale Organic Experiment

6.       A.I. Vogel

:

Elementary Practical Organic Chemistry − Part I, II & III

 

                                                                                        Course: CHEL-4130

Quantitative Inorganic Analysis Lab-II

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);    3 Credit point.

 

1. Complexometric Titration:

i)      Determination copper using fast sulphon Black F indicator

ii)    Determination of zinc using Eriochrome Black T indicator

2 Precipitation Titrations :

i)      Determination of chloride by Volhard's method,

ii)    Determination of bromide,

iii)   Determination of equilibrium and solubility product constant of silver acetate.

3. Gravimetric Analysis: Synthesis and determination

i)      Determination of SO42- as BaSO4

ii)    Synthesis and determination of Ni as dimethylglyoximate

iii)   Synthesis and determination of oxalate as calcium oxalate

iv)  Determination of manganese as manganese ammonium phosphate monohydrated.

4. Analysis of Mixture:

i)      Determination of Cu (II) & Ni (II) in a mixture

ii)    Determination of Cu (II) & Zn (II) in a mixture.

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       A. I. Vogel

:

A Text Book of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis

2.       A. I. Vogel

:

Quantitative Organic Analysis

3.       Clarke

:

A Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry

4.       Shriner and Fuson

:

 Identification of Organic Compounds

5.       Stock and Rice

:

Chromatographic Methods

6.        W G Palmer

:

Experimental Inorganic Chemistry

7.        G Pass and H Sutcliff

:

Practical Inorganic Chemisry

8.        J D Woolins

:

Inorganic Experiment

9.        Z S Zafran, R M Pike and M M Singh

:

Microscale Inorganic Chemistry

 

4th Year 2nd Semester

 

Course: CHE-4211

Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro analytical Methods

Examination: 3 hours

 
100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30%, (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)             3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1. Electrode kinetics:                                                               

Faradaic and nonfaradaic process, Factors affecting electrode reaction rate and current, Mass transport controlled reaction: diffusion, convection and migration, Charge transfer kinetics, Reactions controlled by rate of electron transfer: Butler-Volmer model of electrode kinetics, The Tafel law, Kinetic treatment based on exchange current, Theories of electrified interfaces, The electrical double layer, Helmholtz, Gouy-Chapman, Stern and Grahame double layer models, Electrokinetic phenomena, Electroosmosis, Electrophoresis, Paper electrophoresis, Gel electrophoresis, Electrocapillary effect,

2. Electroanalytical Methods:                                                     

(a) Practical considerations: Electrochemical cells, Solvents and supporting electrolytes, instrumentations, Working electrodes, Heterogeneous electrochemical system, Potential as electron energy, Current as rate. 

(b) Polarography: Principle & constituent of polarography, Current-potential curve, Half wave potential, Residual current, Migration current, Diffusion current, limiting current, Charging current, Dropping mercury electrode, Supporting electrolyte, Polarographic maxima, Interference of oxygen,  

(c) Voltammetry: Stepping voltametry: Chronoamperometry, Cottrell equation, Sweeping voltammetry: Reversible steady state voltammetry, Linear sweep voltammetry and Cyclic voltametry, Generation of sweeping voltammetry from concentration-distance profile, Effect of charging current on sweeping voltammetry, Pulse voltammetry: Normal pulse voltammetry, Differential pulse voltammetry and Square wave voltammetry.

(d) Bulk electrolysis: Electrolytic cell, Principles of electrolysis, Coulometry: Principle of coulometric method, Constant Potential coulometry, Constant current coulometry, Coulometric titrations, Electrogravimetry: Controlled potential and controlled current electrogravimetry.

 

3. Fabrication of different modern modified electrodes:                                       

Chemically modified electrodes: Self-assembled monolayers, Electrocatalytic modified electrodes, Preconcentrating electrodes and Permselective coatings, Conducting polymer modified electrode, Nano-materials.modified electrode, Application of modern modified electrodes in electrochemical sensors.

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       S. Glasstone and Lewis

:

Introduction to Electrochemistry

2.       Bockris and Reddy

:

Advanced Electrochemistry

3.       D.R. Crow

:

Principle and application of electrochemistry

4.       Bard and Faulkner

:

Electrochemical Methods

5.       P.W. Atkins

:

Selected topics from Physical Chemistry

6.       Skoog

:

Analytical Chemistry

7.       Willard, Merit, Dean & Jones

:

Instrumental Methods of Analytical Chemistry

8.       R.A.Dey & A.L Underwood

:

Quantitative Analysis

 

 

 

 

Course: CHE-4212

Solid State Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%),             2 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 30

 

1.       Solid Defects

Perfect crystal, defects, classification of defects, point defects, defects in ionic solids, impurity atom & lattice vacancy, Schottky and Frenkel defects, equilibrium concentration of Schottky and Frenkel defects, non-stoichiometric defects, colour centers, extrinsic point defects.

2.       Electrical Properties of Solids: Theories of Solids

Electron-gas model, band theory of solids, quantum mechanical approach, band structure of solids, classification of solids on the basis of band theory, semi conductors and their types, intrinsic and extrinsic semi conductivity, doping, measurement of semiconductivity, conductivity of non-stoichiometric metal oxides, controlled valency by semiconductors, dependence of conductivity of some metal oxides on oxygen pressure, application of semiconductors, p-n junction, superconductors, hall effect.

Properties of solid surfaces

Single crystals, polycrystalline solids, surface cleaning, techniques of characterization of solid surfaces. LEED, XPS auger spectroscopy, chemisorptions of solid surfaces, catalysis.

Reaction of Solids Solid-gas, solid-liquid and solid-solid reactions, role of defects, kinetics of decomposition of solids, factors influencing the reactivity in solids, tarnishing reactions, photolysis of solids, photography, photoconductivity, photo cells for solar energy conversion.

 Books Recommended:

 

1.       N.B. Hanny

:

Solid State Chemistry

2.       L.V. Azarof

:

Introduction to Solids

3.       A.K. Galway

:

Solid State Chemistry

4.       A.R. West

:

Solid State Chemistry and its Application

5.       P.W. Atkins

:

Selected Topics from Physical Chemistry

6.       G H Stout and L H Jenson

:

X-ray structure determination

7.       Adams

:

Inorganic Solids

Course: CHE-4221

Chromatographic and Other Separation Techniques

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%), 2 Credit points; Number of Lectures – 30

 

1.    Chromatography:                                                              

Definition and classification, chromatographic behavior of solute, retention behavior, partition coefficient, column efficiency, resolution, quantitative analysis, evaluation method, classification of chromatographic methods.

(i)      Plane chromatography: Principle of paper chromatography (PC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC), nature of  mobile phase, stationary phases, development, location of spot, quantitative methods, applications.

(ii)    Liquid column chromatography: Principles, stationary phases, mobile phases and applications.

(iii)  High performance Liquid chromatography (HPLC): The HPLC system, solvent requirements, filtration and  degassing, column, solvent pumping system, injection system, detectors and applications.

(iv)   Gas Chromatography: Principles, supports: stationary phase, the stationary (liquid) phase, carrier gas, sample injection system, column, types of detectors, applications. GC-MS and its applications. 

(v)     ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma): ICP (Inductively coupled plasma), ICP-MS, ICP-AES.

(vi)   Ion-exchange method: Principles, types of resin, structure, swelling, effect of pH, separation of metal ions, action of ion exchange resins, applications.

(vii)  Electrophoresis: Principle of electrophoresis: Paper, gel and capillary electrophoresis. Nature of support system and buffers; Scope of separation of low and high molecular weight charged materials including protein, enzymes, etc.

2.       Extraction Techniques: Solid-Liquid, Liquid-Liquid extraction, steam distillation, fractional distillation.

   

 

Books Recommended:

 

1.       A.I  Vogel

:

A Textbook of Quantitative Analysis

2.       G.D Christion

:

Analytical Chemistry, 5th Ed

3.       D. Skoog, D.M. West and F.J. Holler

:

Fundamental of analytical chemistry, 5th Ed

4.       J.H Kennedy

:

Analytical chemistry principal

 

 

 

Course: CHE-4231
Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

Examination: 3 hours

100 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%)              3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 45

 

1. Symmetry and Group Theory

Symmetry elements and operations, point group, group theory, group of low symmetry, group of high symmetry, proper and improper axis, plane of symmetry and reflection operation, molecular dissymmetry and optical activity, multiplication of symmetry operations, rules for multiplication, group multiplication table, identification of point group, uses of flow chart to identify a point group, properties and representations of groups, symmetry operations and matrix representations, Reducible and irreducible representations, character tables.

2. Lanthanides and Actinides

General chemistry of the lanthanides and actinides, electronic configurations, positions in the periodic table, oxidation states, origin of colours, magnetic properties, complex formation, reactivity, lanthanide contraction, effects of lanthanide contraction, uses of lanthanides, separation of lanthanides, comparison of 3d-elements with 4f- electrons.

3. Inorganic Polymer

Polymerization, methods of polymerization, concepts of inorganic polymers as distinct to organic polymers, classification of inorganic polymers, chain and network polymers, studies of some typical inorganic polymers, P-N polymer, S-N polymer, B-N polymer, silicone polymer, metal-coordination polymer, fluorocarbons: preparation, structure and uses, plastic, thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers.

4. Non-aqueous Solvents

Definition of solvent, classification of solvents, properties of ionising solvents, solubility criteria in solvents, acid-base phenomena in nonaqueous solvents, types of chemical reactions in solvents, studies of some typical non-aqueous solvents: liquid ammonia, anhydrous sulphuric acid, liquid sulphur dioxide, liquid hydrogen fluoride.

 

5. Chemistry of Arsenic

Introduction, occurrence, extraction, uses, periodicity of properties, chemical reactivity, intermetallic compounds and alloys, hydrides, halides, oxides and oxo-acids, sulphides and related compounds, metal-as clusters, organo AsIII and As(IV) compounds, arsenic in groundwater, biological affections of arsenic, qualitative, semi quantitative and quantitative detection of arsenic in groundwater and biological samples.

6. Materials Chemistry

Introduction, important aspects of material science: performance, properties, structure and synthesis, designing materials: lithographic resist materials, high conductivity solid polymeric electrolytes, preceramic polymers, molecular magnets, catalytic materials, molecular sieves, endosemiconductors and exosemiconductors, inorganic biomaterials interfacial reactions.

 

Books Recommended

 

1.       Cotton and Wilkinson

:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

2.       Shriver and Atkins

:

Inorganic Chemistry

3.       Sisler

:

Non aqueous solvent systems

4.       N N Greenwood and Earmshaw

:

Chemistry of the elements

5.       LV Interrante, L A Casper, A B Ellis

:

Materials Chemistry

6.       Saul Patai              

:

The Chemistry of organic Arsenic

7.       James E. Huheey

:

Inorganic Chemistry

 

 

 

Course: CHE-4232
Nuclear Chemistry

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Class Attendance 10%), 2 Credit points; Number of Lectures- 30

                                                  

1. Nucleus and its properties

Nucleus and its composition, nuclear radius and density, nuclear mass and energy correlation, nuclear binding energy, mass defect and packing fraction, nuclear potential barrier, elementary concepts of nuclear structure, nuclear force, nuclear spin.

2. Radioactivity

Definition and discovery, natural and artificial radioactivity, radioactive rays, types of radio-activity, nuclear stability and instability, radioactive series, units of radioactivity, radiation dose, radioactive decay, radioactive disintegration law, disintegration constant, half life, average life, relation, between half-life and average life, radioactive equilibria.

3. Nuclear Reactions

Concepts of nuclear reactions and comparison with chemical reactions, types of nuclear reaction, mechanism of nuclear reaction, Q-value in nuclear reaction, nuclear reaction cross reaction, excitation function, Nuclear fission and fusion reaction, fission probability, mass and charge distributions, fission and chain reaction, liquid drop model of nuclear fission, nuclear fission atom bomb, nuclear fusion and   energy release H-bomb, sources of energy of Sun.

4. Interaction of Radiation with Matter

Mechanism of energy loss, interaction of charged particles: (α, ß proton) with matter, interaction of gamma radiation with matter, Compton effect, pair production, auger effect, principle of detection of radiation, ionization chamber, Geiger Muller counter (GM counter), scintillation detector.

5. Nuclear reactor

Principle, parts of a nuclear reactor, research reactor: graphite reactor, water reactor, power reactor, heavy application of nuclear reactor.

 

Books Recommended:

 

1.       H. J.  Arnikor

:

Essentials of Nuclear Chemistry

2.       Gerhart Friedlander Joseph W. Kennedy, Jullian Malcon Miller

:

Nuclear and radiochemistry

3.       G.R. Choppen and Rydbery

:

Nuclear Chemistry and its applications

4.       WD Ehman and DE Vance

:

Radiochemistry and nuclear methods of analysis

5.       Choppin and Mayer

:

Nuclear chemistry

6.       L.Yapte

:

Nuclear Chemistry, Vol -1,2

7.       B. G. Harvey

:

Introduction to Nuclear physics and Chemistry

Course: CHE-4233

Crystallography

Examination: 2 hours

50 Marks: Theory 70%, Continuous assessment 30% (Mid-Semester Examination 20%, Attendance 10%), 3 Credit points; Number of Lectures - 30

 

1. Structure of solids

Crystalline and amorphous solids, distinction between crystalline and amorphous solids, isomorphism, polymorphism, allotropy.

2. Close Pack Structure

Hexagonal, cubic and body centered cubic structure, tetrahedral and octahedral sites, radius ratio rule, coordination number of an ion.

3. Structure of Ionic Crystals

NaCl, CsCl, Zinc blende, wurtzite, fluorite, rutile, spinel, perovskite and illmenite structure.

4. Crystals

Crystallinity, crystal classes, ideal crystals, ideally imperfect crystals and imperfect crystals.

5.  Inside a Crystal

Crystal lattice and unit cell, crystal systems, bravice lattice, miller indices, fractional coordinates, crystal symmetry operations, point groups, space group, systematic absences.

6. X-rays and Crystals

Generation of x-ray, absorption of x-ray, diffraction of x-ray by crystals, Bragg’s equation, reciprocal lattice, x-ray photograph, weissenberg and rotation photograph, diffractometry, the indexing of reflections and determination of space group, density and molecular weight determination.

   

Books Recommended:

 

2.       N.B. Hanny

:

Solid State Chemistry

3.       L.V. Azarof

:

Introduction to Solids

4.       A.K. Galway

:

Solid State Chemistry

5.       A.R. West

:

Solid State Chemistry and its Application

6.       P.W. Atkins

:

Selected Topics from Physical Chemistry

7.       G H Stout and L H Jenson

:

X-ray structure determination

8.       Adams

:

Inorganic Solids

 

 

 

 

Course: CHEL-4210

Physical Chemistry Lab-IV

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);    3 Credit point

 

1. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of solids.

2. Determination of the activation energy of a chemical reaction.

3. Determination of equilibrium constant of a reaction by the measurement of emf and by titration.

4. Determination of the order and rate constant of chemical reactions.

5. Characterization of Polymers by measurement of density, viscosity, IR spectrum & by EDTA.

6. Determination of particle sizes.

07. Determination of Fe2+ ion concentration in a given solution by potentiometric titration and to determine the value of E0 Fe2+/Fe3+

08. Determination of the intensity of light scarce and study of various photochemical reactions.    

09. Determination of the composition of a complex compound. 

10. Study of the electrokinetic phenomena.

11. Study of adsorption from solution on solids.

 

Books Recommended

9.       Findlay’s Practical Physical Chemistry

:

Revised edition (Longman

10.    Daniel, Mathews  and  Willium

:

Experimental Physical Chemistry

11.    Bell and New Combe

:

Experiments in Physical Chemistry

12.    Vogel’s Quantitative Inorganic Analysis

:

Revised edition

 

Course: CHEL-4220

Chemical Process Industries-II (Organic)

Examination: 6 hours

 

100 Marks: i) Experiment: 70, (ii) Continuous Lab. Assessment: 30 (Attendance - 10, Participation and performance/Oral test/Assignment/Written test on Laboratory work/Field work/Internship/Project research -20);   3 Credit points

 

Organic Industrial Chemistry Experiments:

1.       Determination of iodine, saponification, acid and R. M. value of oils and fats.

2.       Determination of total acid and alkali in a soap sample

3.       Determination of free acid and free alkali in soap sample

4.       Determination of reducing sugar in supplied sugar sample.

5.       Determination of the purity of sugar with the help of Fehling's solution.

6.       Determination of ascorbic acid in Vitamin-C tablet 

7.       Analysis of soil for (a) clay (b) silica (c) borosilicate (d) different trace elements (e) organic matters.

8.       Determination of β-cellulose content in the supplied pulp.

 

 

Books Recommended:

1.       A.I. Vogel

:

Qualitative Organic Analysis

2.       A.I. Vogel

:

Quantitative Organic Analysis

3.       Fritz and Hammond

:

Quantitative Organic Analysis

4.       K. L. Williamson

:

Macroscale and Microscale Organic experiment

5.       J. Bassett and others

:

Vogel’s Textbook of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis

Course: CHEV-4200

Viva-voce

50 Marks, 2 Credit point

 

Viva-voce examination includes the assessment of the students through oral examination of all the courses studied in the 4th Year.